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Types of Sentences Practice

Command or Imperative Sentence
Command or Imperative Sentence

Unlike a declarative sentence, where the subject and verb are clearly articulated, imperative sentences do not have a readily identifiable subject when written out. The subject is actually implied or elliptical, meaning that the verb refers directly back to the subject.

source: thoughtco.com
Compound Sentences
Compound Sentences

Using a colon in a compound sentence is rare in everyday English grammar, however; you're most likely to encounter its use in complex technical writing. Simple vs. Compound Sentences. In some occasions you may be unsure of whether the sentence you're reading is simple or compound.

source: thoughtco.com
Compound-Complex Sentences
Compound-Complex Sentences

complex / compound-complex? 2. We can put together the puzzle, which Aunt Lucy brought, or we can play the board game that was in the closet. complex / compound-complex? 3. The laptop that I bought last year is still working, but the new one that my sister bought me has crashed. complex / compound-complex? 4.

Declarative
Declarative

Can you tell whether or not a sentence is a statement, a question, or an order? Let's find out! Let's find out! If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website.

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Exclamatory Sentence
Exclamatory Sentence

Take this helpful interactive quiz and printable worksheet, and you can assess your understanding of exclamatory sentences at any time that's...

source: study.com
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Imperative
Imperative

Imperative sentences often appear to be missing subjects and use a verb to begin the sentence. In fact, the subject is the person listening, or the audience. In other words, if an imperative sentence is directed at you, then you are the subject of that sentence.

source: study.com
Interrogative
Interrogative

This exercise will give you practice in changing the word order and verb forms as you convert declarative sentences into interrogative sentences. This exercise will give you practice in changing the word order and verb forms as you convert declarative sentences into interrogative sentences.

source: thoughtco.com
Question or Interrogative Sentence
Question or Interrogative Sentence

This exercise will give you practice in changing word order and (in some cases) verb forms as you convert 20 declarative sentences into interrogative sentences. After completing this exercise, try Practice in Forming Declarative Sentences.

source: thoughtco.com
Simple or Declarative Sentence
Simple or Declarative Sentence

Types of Declarative Sentences As with other types of sentences, a declarative can be either simple or compound. A simple declaratory sentence is the union of a subject and a predicate, as simple as a subject and verb in the present tense (She sings).

source: thoughtco.com
Simple Sentences
Simple Sentences

Identify which sentences are simple and which are compound If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website. If you're behind a web filter, please make sure that the domains *.kastatic.org and *.kasandbox.org are unblocked.