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Types of Shoulder Surgery

Arthroscopic Bankart Procedure
Arthroscopic Bankart Procedure

The Bankart Repair involves re-anchoring and suturing the torn piece of cartilage to restore security and stability to the shoulder. This procedure is typically performed arthroscopically at an outpatient surgery center, meaning patients go home several hours after the surgery has been completed.

image: alamy.com
Arthroscopic Debridement
Arthroscopic Debridement

What is Shoulder Arthroscopy and Debridement? Debridement is a procedure used to remove debris and damaged tissue in the shoulder joint. This procedure is performed as minimally invasive as possible by using a very small camera called an arthroscope.

Bone Spur Removal
Bone Spur Removal

Shoulder Surgery Bone Spur Removal Causes Problems By Chris Centeno on November 17, 2014 I commonly see patients with chronic shoulder pain who have undergone a shoulder surgery bone spur removal to “open up” the shoulder. Known as distal clavicular resection, it’s one of the most commonly performed shoulder surgeries with rotator cuff repair. New research now shows that the surgery doesn’t help and leads to more shoulder instability which frequently causes more pain and arthritis.

source: regenexx.com
image: regenexx.com
Dislocated Shoulder/Shoulder Instability
Dislocated Shoulder/Shoulder Instability

The shoulder is the most moveable joint in your body. It helps you to lift your arm, rotate it, and reach up over your head. This greater range of motion, however, can cause instability. Shoulder instability happens when the head of the upper arm bone is forced out of the shoulder socket—your ...

Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)
Frozen Shoulder (Adhesive Capsulitis)

The main symptoms of a frozen shoulder are pain and stiffness that make it difficult or impossible to move it. If you have frozen shoulder, you’ll likely feel a dull or achy pain in one shoulder. You might also feel the pain in the shoulder muscles that wrap around the top of your arm. You might feel the same sensation in your upper arm.

source: webmd.com
Removal of Inflamed Tissue or Loose Cartilage
Removal of Inflamed Tissue or Loose Cartilage

Loose bodies like cartilage, bone or inflamed tissue can remain or become free floating in the joint space. These loose bodies can be caught in the shoulder during movement. Characteristics of Loose bodies: Cause: Age related wear & tear OR degenerative changes OR fractures OR trauma OR articular cartilage injuries. Symptoms: Pain, decreased range of […]

Removal or Repair of the Labrum
Removal or Repair of the Labrum

The labrum is the cup-shaped rim of cartilage that lines and reinforces the ball and socket joint of the shoulder, which is comprised of the glenoid - the shallow shoulder socket - and the head, or ball, of the upper arm bone known as the humerus.

source: hss.edu
Repair for Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation
Repair for Recurrent Shoulder Dislocation

In very young patients (below the age of 25 years) and high demand athletes, there may be a case need for surgery (Bankart repair) immediately after the first dislocation to prevent the chance of further dislocations as the incidence of recurrent dislocation in these patients is very high.

Repair of Ligaments
Repair of Ligaments

Tendon and Ligament Repairs and Reconstruction Due to the complex structure of the shoulder, ligaments and tendons within the shoulder are more susceptible to injury. The shoulder structure is made of three major joints: glenohumeral joint, the acromioclavicular joint, and the sternoclavicular joint.

image: neises.org
Rotator Cuff Repair
Rotator Cuff Repair

Arthroscopic repair is often used for patients with small- to medium-sized tears (about 3 cm or smaller). It is an outpatient procedure and the least invasive of the three rotator cuff repair options. See Decompression Surgery for Shoulder Impingement. Unlike open repair, arthroscopic surgery involves small incisions, each about a centimeter long.

Rotator Cuff Tears
Rotator Cuff Tears

After rotator cuff surgery, a small percentage of patients experience complications. In addition to the risks of surgery in general, such as blood loss or problems related to anesthesia, complications of rotator cuff surgery may include: Nerve injury. This typically involves the nerve that activates your shoulder muscle (deltoid). Infection.

image: regenexx.com
Shoulder Arthritis (Shoulder Osteoarthritis)
Shoulder Arthritis (Shoulder Osteoarthritis)

Shoulder Osteoarthritis (Degenerative Arthritis of the Shoulder) Osteoarthritis of the Knee (Degenerative Arthritis of the Knee) Your risk of developing osteoarthritis of the shoulder with its pain and physical limitations increases with age.

source: webmd.com
Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis
Shoulder Impingement/Rotator Cuff Tendinitis

Your arm is kept in your shoulder socket by your rotator cuff. These muscles and tendons form a covering around the head of your upper arm bone and attach it to your shoulder blade. There is a lubricating sac called a bursa between the rotator cuff and the bone on top of your shoulder (acromion).

image: kcbj.com
Shoulder Replacement
Shoulder Replacement

Partial shoulder replacement: Only the ball gets replaced. Reverse shoulder replacement: Usually, you'd get this if you have a torn rotator cuff. It’s also done when another shoulder replacement surgery didn’t work. The metal ball gets attached to your shoulder bones, and a socket is implanted at the top of your arm.

source: webmd.com
SLAP Tear
SLAP Tear

There are many different kinds of shoulder labrum tears. A labrum SLAP tear covers a specific area. The upper, or superior, part of your labrum attaches to your biceps tendon. In a labrum SLAP tear, SLAP stands for superior labrum anterior and posterior.

source: webmd.com