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Types of Skin Grafts

Allograft
Allograft

There are two basic types of skin grafts: split-thickness and full-thickness grafts. Split-thickness grafts. A split-thickness graft involves removing the top layer of the skin — the epidermis — as well as a portion of the deeper layer of the skin, called the dermis.

Autograft
Autograft

Skin grafting is a surgical procedure that involves removing skin from one area of the body and moving it, or transplanting it, to a different area of the body. This surgery may be done if a part of your body has lost its protective covering of skin due to burns, injury, or illness.

image: phe.gov
Bark Graft
Bark Graft

Skin grafting is a surgical procedure that involves removing skin from one area of the body and moving it, or transplanting it, to a different area of the body. This surgery may be done if a part of your body has lost its protective covering of skin due to burns, injury, or illness.

Cleft Graft
Cleft Graft

Skin grafting is a surgical procedure that involves removing skin from one area of the body and moving it, or transplanting it, to a different area of the body. This surgery may be done if a part of your body has lost its protective covering of skin due to burns, injury, or illness.

Donor Site
Donor Site

If you receive the most common type of skin graft, it will mean skin from another part of your body being transplanted to a wound. Naturally, then, you will have a wound at the donor site too. You must care for your skin graft to ensure it adheres and heals well, but you must also take care of the donor site and to prevent infection. It is often the case that the donor site hurts more and produces more exudate, or fluid from the wound site, as it is a large open wound.

Escharotomy
Escharotomy

a site where healthy skin is taken and used as a graft Escharotomy A surgical procedure that opens or removes eschar from a burn site to reduce tension on a surrounding structure, relieve pressure from interstitial edema, and subsequently enhance circulation.

source: quizlet.com
Full Thickness Graft
Full Thickness Graft

Full-thickness skin graft: This is also called FTSG. Full-thickness skin grafts are made up of epidermis and the whole thickness of the dermis. If FTSG is to be used, a piece of your skin will be cut into the correct size and shape to fit the wound.

source: drugs.com
image: e-hand.com
Mesh Graft
Mesh Graft

mesh graft a type of split-thickness graft in which many tiny splits have been made in the skin to allow it to be stretched to cover a larger area.

image: drugline.org
Recipient Site
Recipient Site

A split-thickness graft involves removing the top layer of the skin — the epidermis — as well as a portion of the deeper layer of the skin, called the dermis. These layers are taken from the donor site, which is the area where the healthy skin is located. Split-thickness skin grafts are usually harvested from the front or outer thigh, abdomen, buttocks, or back.

Side Veneer Graft
Side Veneer Graft

Side-veneer also works on deciduous plants such as maples and fruit trees and is in fact used by professionals in production of these species, making side-veneer one of the most versatile grafts. Since you are making just two long straight cuts with the grain of the wood and two very small cuts across the grain, this is one of the technically easier grafts to make.

source: thespruce.com
Whip and Tongue Graft
Whip and Tongue Graft

Download whip and tongue graft doc. The ‘whip and tongue’ graft is probably the most widely adopted method of bench grafting. Ideally choose root and scion material of the same thickness as this maximises the chance of cambial contact all the way around.

source: ptes.org
Xenograft (Heterograft)
Xenograft (Heterograft)

Xenograft or heterograft is skin taken from a variety of animals, usually a pig. Heterograft skin became popular because of the limited availability and high expense of human skin tissue. Wound coverage using heterograft is a temporary covering used until autograft.