A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Slip Knots

Anchor Bend​
Anchor Bend​

The anchor bend is a knot used for attaching a rope to a ring or similar termination. Its name originates from the time when "bend" was understood to mean "tie to", and not restricted to knots that join rope ends. While the knot can become jammed in some modern materials, it is usually easily untied after moderate loads; it can be made more resistant to jamming by taking an extra turn around ...

image: netknots.com
Ashley's Bend​
Ashley's Bend​

Ashley's bend is a knot used to securely join the ends of two ropes together. It is similar to several related bend knots which consist of two interlocking overhand knots, and in particular the alpine butterfly bend. These related bends differ by the way the two constituent overhand knots are interlocked.

Blake's Hitch​
Blake's Hitch​

The Blake’s Hitch is a friction knot popular with arborists for ascending and descending on ropes. The name derives from Jason Blake who is credited with describing the knot to other arborists in 1994.

source: netknots.com
Bowline on a ​Bight​
Bowline on a ​Bight​

2011 testing shows that the knot might slip when only one loop is loaded. Cavers and canyoneers ought to fasten their cow-tail carabiner through both loops. European cavers widely advocate the use of a figure eight twisted version of the Bowline on a bight.

Buntline Hitch​
Buntline Hitch​

The buntline hitch is a knot used for attaching a rope to an object. It is formed by passing the working end around an object, then making a clove hitch around the rope's standing part, taking care that the turns of the clove hitch progress towards the object rather than away from it.

image: netknots.com
Butterfly Loop​
Butterfly Loop​

knot can also be used to isolate a damaged section of a rope. Scroll to see Animated Alpine Butterfly Knot below the illustration and tying instructions. Alpine Butterfly Knot Tying Instructions. Make a loop in the rope and twist it one full rotation into an eight shape. Fold the top of the eight down around the bottom of the eight. Now up and out through the lower opening of the eight and pull tight.

source: netknots.com
image: alamy.com
Carrick Bend​
Carrick Bend​

The carrick bend, also called full carrick bend, sailor's knot, and anchor bend, is perhaps the nearest thing we have to a perfect bend. It is symmetrical, it is easy to tie, it does not slip easily in wet material, it is among the strongest of knots, it cannot jam and is readily untied.

image: 101knots.com
Cat's paw​
Cat's paw​

Cat's Paw. How to tie a Cat's Paw Knot. This is the best knot for attaching a sling to a hook for lifting loads. See animated Cat's Paw below. Cat's Paw Knot Tying Instructions

source: netknots.com
Clove Hitch​
Clove Hitch​

The slip clove hitch is very similar to the clove hitch knot, except that it's easier to untie. This is the knot used by cowboys to tie up their horses. Follow along with this video survival training tutorial and learn how to tie a slip clove hitch knot.

Constrictor ​Knot​
Constrictor ​Knot​

Also known as the Miller’s Knot this knot is useful for securing the end of a sack or bundles of items. The knot stays tied and grips itself so well that it is often impossible to untie. Scroll to see Animated Constrictor Knot below the illustration and tying instructions.

source: netknots.com
image: 101knots.com
Cow Hitch​
Cow Hitch​

The cow hitch is a hitch knot used to attach a rope to an object. The cow hitch comprises a pair of half-hitches tied in opposing directions, as compared to the clove hitch in which the half-hitches are tied in the same direction.

image: 101knots.com
Double ​Bowline​
Double ​Bowline​

How to Tie a Double Bowline Climbing Knot Two Methods: Tying the Double Bowline Backing Up with a Stopper Knot Community Q&A A lot of people use the figure-8 knot for tying in, but the bowline (pronounced "bow-lin") is just as safe if done correctly, pulled tightly, and backed up with a safety knot.

source: wikihow.com
Double ​Fisherman's Knot​
Double ​Fisherman's Knot​

Double Fisherman's Knot. How to tie the Double Fisherman's Knot. This knot securely ties two ropes together or can be used to fasten the ends of a rope or cord to make a closed loop or sling. Rarely used infishing, the Double Fisherman’s Knot is essentially two knots that slide together when tightened to form the finished knot.

source: netknots.com
image: netknots.com
Double ​Overhand Knot​
Double ​Overhand Knot​

The double overhand knot is simply a logical extension of the regular overhand knot, made with one additional pass. The result is slightly larger and more difficult to untie. It forms the first part of the surgeon's knot and both sides of a double fisherman's knot.

Figure-Eight ​Knot​
Figure-Eight ​Knot​

Knots; Figure-Eight Slip Knot. The figure-eight slip knot forms an adjustable bight in a rope.This knot is used for retrievable anchors and fixed rope installations for the ease of untying the knot.

Flemish Bend​
Flemish Bend​

The Flemish bend, also known as a figure eight bend, a double figure eight bend, and a rewoven figure eight is a knot for joining two ropes of roughly similar size. A loose figure-eight knot is tied in the end of one rope. The second rope is now threaded backwards parallel to the first rope. When properly dressed, the two strands do not cross each other.

image: howset.com
Half Hitch​
Half Hitch​

The Half Hitch – attaches a rope to something, e.g., a Hitching Post; The Half Knot – a binding knot – first part of a Square (Reef) Knot. Tying it: As shown in the animation it can be capsized from looking like an overhand knot into the normal look of a Half Hitch.

image: netknots.com
Handcuff Knot​
Handcuff Knot​

A handcuff knot is a knot tied in the bight having two adjustable loops in opposing directions, able to be tightened around hands or feet. The knot itself does not possess any inherent locking action, and thus is not as easy to use for such purposes as the name might suggest.

image: snipview.com
Icicle Hitch​
Icicle Hitch​

An icicle hitch is a knot that is excellent for connecting to a post when weight is applied to an end running parallel to the post in a specific direction. This type of hitch will hold its place even when holding a substantial load on a smooth surface.

image: netknots.com
Klemheist ​Knot​
Klemheist ​Knot​

The Klemheist Knot is tied by making a Prusik Loop with line or rope that is no more than 1/2 the diameter of the main, static rope. The resulting friction knot loop can then slide up the rope but grips when subjected to load.

source: netknots.com
Monkey's Fist​
Monkey's Fist​

A monkey's fist or monkey paw is a type of knot, so named because it looks somewhat like a small bunched fist/paw. It is tied at the end of a rope to serve as a weight, making it easier to throw, and also as an ornamental knot.

Munter Hitch​
Munter Hitch​

Welcome to Animated Knots by Grog. ... Munter Mule Combination Hitch ... is used to secure the Munter. Using a bight of the rope, a Slip Knot followed by a Half Hitch ...

image: youtube.com
Overhand ​Loop​
Overhand ​Loop​

Slip Knot Details. Uses: The slip knot (ABOK # 529, p 87) is identical in structure to the Noose Knot except that the bight to be inserted is formed from the short end – not the long. It is one of the most frequently tied knots - being used in knitting as the first loop when casting on – where it is called a slip knot but frequently tied as a noose.

Prusik​
Prusik​

How a Prusik Knot Works. Prusik knots are designed to move freely on a line as you climb. When they are not put under intense force or friction, they can slide up and down with ease. If the end of the rope is pulled suddenly, the friction of the knot will create enough tension to hold the load in place (you, a bag, another person, etc.).

image: netknots.com
Reef Knot​
Reef Knot​

The reef knot, or square knot, is an ancient and simple binding knot used to secure a rope or line around an object. It is sometimes also referred to as a Hercules knot. The knot is formed by tying a left-handed overhand knot and then a right-handed overhand knot, or vice versa.

Rolling Hitch​
Rolling Hitch​

Under Load: The Rolling Hitch is one of the few knots which can be tied and untied with load on. It does not bind and, when tied correctly, does not slip. However, in critical applications some authorities recommend using the tail end to tie a second Rolling Hitch to back up the first.

Running ​Bowline​
Running ​Bowline​

The knot does not bind against the standing line and can be easily undone. Scroll to see Animated Running Bowline Knot below the illustration and tying instructions. Running Bowline Knot Tying Instructions. Double the end of a rope and wrap tag end over then under standing line and up to side of new loop created.

source: netknots.com
Sheepshank​
Sheepshank​

Eliminate It: If you are asked to learn to tie the Sheepshank, please request your Troop Leader to eliminate this knot and replace it with something safe and useful, e.g., the Alpine Butterfly Loop is an excellent way of isolating a damaged section in a length of rope; it may also be safely used to shorten a rope.

image: netknots.com
Sheet Bend​
Sheet Bend​

The sheet bend is related in structure to the bowline. It is very fast to tie, and along with the bowline and clove hitch is considered so essential it is knot №1 in the Ashley Book of Knots. It is a more secure replacement for the reef knot (square knot), especially in its doubled variety.

Stevedore ​Knot​
Stevedore ​Knot​

Uses: The Stevedore is a reliable moderately bulky stopper knot. Is is an excellent knot to use when setting a tarp – it can be used to secure an end that has been passed through a grommet. Structure: The knot starts out as though tying a Figure 8 Knot.

Stopper Knot​
Stopper Knot​

The Double Figure Eight Stopper Knot or the Stevedore Knot should be used with slippery lines like Dyneema SK-75 (Amsteel, Spectra, etc.) as this knot is more secure requiring a much higher load to slip than more common stopper knots.

source: captnmike.com
image: netknots.com
Taut-Line Hitch​
Taut-Line Hitch​

Tautline Hitch. How to tie the Tautline Hitch Knot. This knot can be slipped to tighten or loosen a line, then holds fast under load. Useful for lines that may need adjustment. The Tautline Hitch is essentially a Rolling Hitch tied on the standing part of a tight line after it has been secured around a object.

source: netknots.com
image: netknots.com
Timber Hitch​
Timber Hitch​

Timber Hitch How to tie the Timber Hitch Knot. Use for securing a rope around a post or any cylindrical object. It does not jam or slip, no matter how heavy the load and is easy to tie and untie. It is best to complete the Timber Hitch with one or two half hitches near the hauling end to keep the load from twisting.

source: netknots.com
Trucker's Hitch​
Trucker's Hitch​

Real Truckers: The Animation was prepared to show the structure of the knot. In practice at step 6, a Real Trucker will pass a bight of rope through the loop and then use the bight to tie off the knot with half hitches. This allows him to use one long piece of rope to tie many Trucker's Hitches.

Water Knot​
Water Knot​

The knot should be arranged neatly and pulled tight. Other Names: The Water Knot is also known by various other names including: Tape Knot, Ring Bend, Grass Knot, and Overhand Follow-Through. Uses: In climbing it is used to join two pieces of webbing strapping.

Whipping Knot​
Whipping Knot​

The Common Whipping is a knot tied at the end of a rope to keep the end from unraveling. The benefit of the Common Whipping knot is that it is quite easy to tie and no tools are required. However, the knot is more appropriate for temporary use or on decorative ropes as it is known to slip off the rope easily.

source: netknots.com
image: netknots.com
Zeppelin ​Bend​
Zeppelin ​Bend​

The Alpine Butterfly Bend, the Zeppelin, and the Carrick could all be untied easily using fingers and fingernails. Amongst the family of bends based on linked overhand knots, it would seem prudent to avoid the Ashley and the Hunter's.

image: 101knots.com

Related Types