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Types of Social Anxiety

Generalized Anxiety Disorder
Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is characterized by persistent and excessive worry about a number of different things. People with GAD may anticipate disaster and may be overly concerned about money, health, family, work, or other issues. Individuals with GAD find it difficult to control their worry.

source: adaa.org
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (Commonly Known as GAD)
Generalized Anxiety Disorder (Commonly Known as GAD)

Generalized anxiety disorder (or GAD) is characterized by excessive, exaggerated anxiety and worry about everyday life events with no obvious reasons for worry. People with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder tend to always expect disaster and can't stop worrying about health, money, family, work, or school.

source: webmd.com
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

OCD and SAD are both anxiety disorders that can render someone disabled and require treatment. I am a therapist in the community and have worked with numerous people diagnosed with Social Anxiety, OCD, and Panic Disorder.

source: beyondocd.org
Panic Disorder
Panic Disorder

Social anxiety disorder usually comes on at around 13 years of age. It can be linked to a history of abuse, bullying, or teasing. Shy kids are also more likely to become socially anxious adults, as are children with overbearing or controlling parents.

source: webmd.com
Panic DisorderAgoraphobia
Panic DisorderAgoraphobia

Panic disorder can interfere a lot with daily life, causing people to miss work, go to many doctor visits, and avoid situations where they fear they might experience a panic attack. The interference is greatest when people also have agoraphobia, as well as panic disorder.

source: adaa.org
Phobias
Phobias

All aspects of your life, not just the social, could start to fall apart. Social anxiety disorder (also known as social phobia) is one of the most common mental disorders, so if you have it, there’s hope.

source: webmd.com
image: graphs.net
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

PTSD and social anxiety disorder (SAD) commonly co-occur, and there are a number of possible reasons why people with PTSD, as compared to those without the diagnosis, may be more likely to develop fears of social situations.

Social Phobia (or Social Anxiety Disorder)
Social Phobia (or Social Anxiety Disorder)

Social anxiety disorder (also known as social phobia) is one of the most common mental disorders, so if you have it, there’s hope. The tough part is being able to ask for help.

source: webmd.com