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Types of Social Mobility

Horizontal Social Mobility
Horizontal Social Mobility

Social mobility is defined as a transition of individuals or groups from one position in the social hierarchy to another. The concept of social mobility is closely linked to the concept of stratification.

Intergenerational Mobility
Intergenerational Mobility

Beyond just inheritable traits which affect income, intergenerational mobility embeds factors such as parents' input to education (both pecuniary and nonpecuniary), residential choice (which affects public school quality and crime), social connections, and income from inherited wealth.

Intra-Generational Mobility:
Intra-Generational Mobility:

Video: Intragenerational Mobility: Definition & Overview Intragenerational mobility refers to changes in someone's social mobility throughout the course of his or her lifetime. Learn the definition of intragenerational mobility, how it differs from intergenerational mobility, and more in this lesson.

source: study.com
Motivation:
Motivation:

In the words of Sorokin, by vertical social mobility is meant the relations involved in transition of an individual (or a social object) from one social stratum to another. According to the direction of transition, there are two types of vertical social mobility – ascending and descending or social climbing and social sinking.

Occupational Mobility:
Occupational Mobility:

occupational mobility Often wrongly called social mobility. It refers to the movement of an occupational group itself, or of an individual member of an occupation, or of an occupational vacancy, through the stratification system of social space.

Upward Mobility:
Upward Mobility:

Fewer than 5 percent of black children grow up in the kind of neighborhoods that most foster upward mobility — low-poverty neighborhoods where most fathers are present. — jerry large, The Seattle Times, "Upward mobility is especially tough for black boys in U.S.

Vertical Mobility:
Vertical Mobility:

Vertical mobility is the movement from one social status to a different social status. It stands in contrast to horizontal mobility, which is the movement from one position within a social status to another position. An example of vertical mobility is a factory worker who enrolls in college and becomes an international businessman. An example of horizontal mobility is a high school student who quits his job as a paperboy to start an internship at a local company.

source: study.com
Vertical Social Mobility
Vertical Social Mobility

Vertical mobility refers to the movement from one level on the social hierarchy to another. In other words, it is a change in social status. A change in any of the factors that influence social status has the potential to lead to vertical mobility.

source: study.com
image: study.com

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