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Types of Spectroscopy

Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AA)
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AA)

Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) is a spectroanalytical procedure for the quantitative determination of chemical elements using the absorption of optical radiation (light) by free atoms in the gaseous state.

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Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (AE)
Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (AE)

Atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) is a method of chemical analysis that uses the intensity of light emitted from a flame, plasma, arc, or spark at a particular wavelength to determine the quantity of an element in a sample.

Flame
Flame

Flame emission spectroscopy is a chemical analysis technique that relies on looking at the energy emitted when excited atoms return to a ground state. Atoms associated with different elements have their own distinct spectral signatures which can be identified with a highly sensitive detector. This method of material analysis is destructive in nature, but can provide important information about the components of an unknown sample of a compound or solution.

source: wisegeek.com
Infrared (IR) and Near Infrared (NIR)
Infrared (IR) and Near Infrared (NIR)

Norwich Near Infrared Consultancy, 10 Aspen Way, Cringleford, Norwich NR4 6UA, UK. When you hold your hand out to a burning fire you “feel” the heat being emitted by the fire but what is happening? The fire gives out light and infrared (IR) radiation; from a fire most of this is near infrared (NIR) radiation.

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, most commonly known as NMR spectroscopy or magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), is a spectroscopic technique to observe local magnetic fields around atomic nuclei.

Spark or arc (Emission) Spectroscopy
Spark or arc (Emission) Spectroscopy

Atomic Emission Spectroscopy with Spark or Arc Excitation 3 1 Introduction It may be little known that even amateur astronomers can generate "laboratory spectra"

source: ursusmajor.ch
Visible/Ultraviolet (UV)
Visible/Ultraviolet (UV)

Visible and Ultraviolet Spectroscopy. 1. Background. An obvious difference between certain compounds is their color. Thus, quinone is yellow; chlorophyll is green; the 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivatives of aldehydes and ketones range in color from bright yellow to deep red, depending on double bond conjugation; and aspirin is colorless.

X-ray
X-ray

X-ray spectroscopy is a gathering name for several spectroscopic techniques for characterization of materials by using x-ray excitation.

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