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Types of Spider Webs

COBWEB SPIDERS
COBWEB SPIDERS

Cobweb spiders like to build their webs and then spend their time hanging upside down in the middle of the web. If you get close enough, check to see if the head of the spider is hanging down right in the center.

source: wikihow.com
FUNNEL WEB SPIDERS
FUNNEL WEB SPIDERS

The primary range of the Australian funnel-web spiders is the eastern coast of Australia, with specimens found in New South Wales, South Australia, Victoria, and Queensland. The only Australian states or territories without funnel-webs are Western Australia and the Northern Territory.

MESH WEB SPIDERS
MESH WEB SPIDERS

Mesh webs, made by Dictynidae family members, are similar to cob webs, although their construction is a little more organized and consistent. Both types of spiders typically hang upside down in their webs.

ORB-WEAVER SPIDERS
ORB-WEAVER SPIDERS

Orb-weaver spiders or araneids are members of the spider family Araneidae. They are the most common group of builders of spiral wheel-shaped webs often found in gardens, fields and forests. "Orb" was previously used in English to mean "circular", hence the English name of the group.

SHEET WEB SPIDERS
SHEET WEB SPIDERS

All spiders produce silk, but not all of them use that silk to make webs for catching prey. Among web-building spiders, different families spin their webs in different patterns. By looking at the shape and structure of a spider web, you usually can determine the type of spider that built it.

TRIANGLE SPIDERS
TRIANGLE SPIDERS

Tangle Web Spiders live in the webs of larger spiders and eat the small prey which are caught and killed in the larger spiders webs. They may also consume the silk from the host web and may sometimes attack and eat the host spider.

image: flickr.com