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Types of Stars List

Alpha Centauri System:
Alpha Centauri System:

Alpha Centauri is a multiple-star system, with its two main stars being Alpha Centauri A (α Cen A) and Alpha Centauri B (α Cen B), usually defined to identify them as the different components of the binary α Cen AB.

Antares:
Antares:

Antares is a red supergiant star that is nearing the end of its life. Once there is no more fuel left to burn, the star will collapse and explode into a supernova — "at which time its brightness will rival that of the rest of our galaxy put together," noted astrophysicists Paul Butterworth and ...

source: space.com
image: howldb.com
Betelgeuse:
Betelgeuse:

The most likely star-formation scenario for Betelgeuse is that it is a runaway star from the Orion OB1 Association. Originally a member of a high-mass multiple system within Ori OB1a, Betelgeuse was probably formed about 10–12 million years ago, but has evolved rapidly due to its high mass.

Main Sequence Star:
Main Sequence Star:

Main sequence stars fuse hydrogen atoms to form helium atoms in their cores. About 90 percent of the stars in the universe, including the sun, are main sequence stars. These stars can range from about a tenth of the mass of the sun to up to 200 times as massive.

source: space.com
Neutron Stars:
Neutron Stars:

A neutron star is the collapsed core of a large star which before collapse had a total of between 10 and 29 solar masses. Neutron stars are the smallest and densest stars, not counting hypothetical quark stars and strange stars.

Pleiades:
Pleiades:

The nine brightest stars of the Pleiades are named for the Seven Sisters of Greek mythology: Sterope, Merope, Electra, Maia, Taygeta, Celaeno, and Alcyone, along with their parents Atlas and Pleione. As daughters of Atlas, the Hyades were sisters of the Pleiades.

Polaris:
Polaris:

In fact, Polaris doesn't even crack the top 40; it's number 48 on the list of brightest stars. What is the North Star? The reason Polaris is so important is because the axis of Earth is pointed almost directly at it. During the course of the night, Polaris does not rise or set, but remains in very nearly the same spot above the northern horizon year-round while the other stars circle around it.

source: space.com
Protostar
Protostar

A protostar is a very young star that is still gathering mass from its parent molecular cloud. The protostellar phase is the earliest one in the process of stellar evolution. For a one solar-mass star it lasts about 1,000,000 years.

image: snipview.com
Red Dwarf Star:
Red Dwarf Star:

The term "red dwarf" when used to refer to a star does not have a strict definition. One of the earliest uses of the term was in 1915, used simply to contrast "red" dwarf stars from hotter "blue" dwarf stars. It became established use, although the definition remained vague.

image: youtube.com
Red Giant Star:
Red Giant Star:

A red giant is a luminous giant star of low or intermediate mass (roughly 0.3–8 solar masses (M ☉)) in a late phase of stellar evolution. The outer atmosphere is inflated and tenuous, making the radius large and the surface temperature around 5,000 K (4,700 °C; 8,500 °F) or lower.

image: quazoo.com
Rigel:
Rigel:

Rigel is a blue supergiant that is the brightest star in the constellation Orion (the Hunter). The star is only 10 million years old, compared to the sun's 4.5 billion, and due to its measured size and brightness it is expected to end in a supernova one day.

source: space.com
Sirius:
Sirius:

Donny Deutsch is the star, executive producer and creator of Donny!, a scripted TV series which aired its first season in fall 2015 on USA Network and is now available on demand. He is the former host of CNBC’s The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch and regularly appears on MSNBC’s Morning Joe.

source: siriusxm.com
Supergiant Stars:
Supergiant Stars:

Only a few useful supergiant stars can be occulted by the Moon, including Antares and Aldebaran. Examples of eclipsing binaries include Epsilon Aurigae, VV Cephei, HR 5171, and the red-giant binary system KIC 9246715 in the constellation of Cygnus.

T Tauri Star:
T Tauri Star:

Naked T Tauri star (NTTS), which is a subset of WTTS. Protoplanetary discs in the Orion Nebula Roughly half of T Tauri stars have circumstellar disks, which in this case are called protoplanetary discs because they are probably the progenitors of planetary systems like the Solar System.

Vega:
Vega:

Vega was the first star other than the Sun to be photographed and the first to have its spectrum recorded. It was one of the first stars whose distance was estimated through parallax measurements.

White Dwarf Star:
White Dwarf Star:

List of white dwarfs ... First found in a binary star system: First double white dwarf system: LDS 275: ... which circles both stars in the PSR B1620-26 system