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Types of Stevia

Acesulfame-K — "Safe
Acesulfame-K — "Safe

Whole-leaf stevia or crude stevia extracts aren't FDA-approved. Acesulfame Potassium (Acesulfame-K or Ace-K) What It Is: Two hundred times sweeter than sugar, acesulfame potassium is a man-made, no-calorie sweetener. You can find it in tabletop packets as Sunett or Sweet One, or in sugar-free gum, light juices, and light ice cream.

source: webmd.com
Aspartame — "Safe"
Aspartame — "Safe"

Among brand names, SweetLeaf is a sweetener made from stevia extract, and both Truvia and Pure Via are stevia-based. Some stores have generic stevia products. The Scoop: Highly purified stevia extracts, which are what you find on the market, are generally recognized as safe.

source: webmd.com
But are low
But are low

Products marketed as 'stevia' are whole leaf Stevia or Stevia extracts of which Rebaudioside A is a component," the FDA said. There are some health concerns surrounding the stevia plant. Stevia may cause low blood pressure, which would be of concern to some taking blood pressure medications.

Coconut Sugar
Coconut Sugar

Pure coconut palm sugar is NOT the same as Palm sugar, a mistake people often make. If you decide to cook with Coconut Palm Sugar and a recipe calls for 1 cup of sugar, simply replace the 1 cup of sugar with 1 cup of Coconut Palm Sugar.

image: iherb.com
Dates
Dates

Stevia (/ ˈ s t iː v i ə, ˈ s t ɛ v i ə /) is a sweetener and sugar substitute extracted from the leaves of the plant species Stevia rebaudiana. The active compounds of stevia are steviol glycosides (mainly stevioside and rebaudioside), which have up to 150 times the sweetness of sugar, are heat-stable, pH-stable, and not fermentable.

Maple Syrup
Maple Syrup

Whichever form of stevia you use, you’ll surely enjoy this pancake syrup and will probably ensure that stevia becomes a staple in your household. Pancakes and maple syrup are like a couple that you often see together. Maple syrup is made from the sap of maple trees (sugar maple, red maple, and black maple).

Raw Honey
Raw Honey

Stevia, a South American herb that has been used as a sweetener for centuries, is a non-nutritive sweetener that provides no calories to the diet. According to Oregon Health and Science University, when measured by volume, honey has slightly more calories than table sugar.

Saccharin — "Safe"
Saccharin — "Safe"

Among brand names, SweetLeaf is a sweetener made from stevia extract, and both Truvia and Pure Via are stevia-based. Some stores have generic stevia products. The Scoop: Highly purified stevia extracts, which are what you find on the market, are generally recognized as safe.

source: webmd.com
Stevia
Stevia

Products marketed as 'stevia' are whole leaf Stevia or Stevia extracts of which Rebaudioside A is a component," the FDA said. There are some health concerns surrounding the stevia plant. Stevia may cause low blood pressure, which would be of concern to some taking blood pressure medications.

Stevia — "Safe"
Stevia — "Safe"

It also contains most of the beneficial properties of stevia that are credited with the health benefits and is the most well studied. Is Stevia Safe? To answer this question, it is important to differentiate between processed forms of stevia and the naturally occurring herbal form.

image: idealraw.com
Sucralose — "Safe"
Sucralose — "Safe"

While stevia is commonly thought to be safer than artificial sweeteners like sucralose, this may not necessarily be the case. Stevia Background Although stevia's popularity may be relatively new to the United States, native South Americans have used it as a sweetener for hundreds of years.

image: alloy.com
Sugar Alcohols (Xylitol) — "Safe"
Sugar Alcohols (Xylitol) — "Safe"

Xylitol is the most common and well-researched sugar alcohol. It has a distinct mint flavor, and is a common ingredient in sugar-free chewing gums, mints and oral care products like toothpaste. It is about as sweet as regular sugar, but has 40% fewer calories.

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