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Types of Strabismus

Accommodative Esotropia
Accommodative Esotropia

What is accommodative esotropia? Accommodative esotropia, or refractive esotropia, is one of the most common forms of strabismus (crossed eye).It refers to eye crossing that is caused by the focusing efforts of the eyes as they try to see clearly.

source: aapos.org
Congenital Esotropia
Congenital Esotropia

Congenital Esotropia "Congenital" means from birth and, using this strict definition, most infants are born with eyes that are not aligned at birth. Only 23% of infants are born with straight eyes.

image: ohioeye.com
Constant or Intermittent?
Constant or Intermittent?

What is Strabismus? by Dr. Jeffrey Cooper & Rachel Cooper (no relation). © 2001-2016 Does the Person Have Constant or Intermittent Strabismus? This is one of the most important findings the eye doctor makes! It is important for you as a parent or patient to understand the difference between constant and intermittent strabismus.

Duane's Syndrome
Duane's Syndrome

Duane's Syndrome (type I) It may be confused with a paralysis of the muscle which causes the eye to turn outwards (lateral rectus) resulting in an unnecessary neurological workup. Duane's is usually congenital and may be associated with other congenital disorders.

Esotropia
Esotropia

Congenital Esotropia "Congenital" means from birth and, using this strict definition, most infants are born with eyes that are not aligned at birth. Only 23% of infants are born with straight eyes.

Exotropia Intermittent Exotropia
Exotropia Intermittent Exotropia

Exotropia -- a common type of strabismus -- is the outward deviation of an eye (eye turns away from the nose). When the eye turns outward only some of the time, it is called intermittent exotropia. Most exotropia is intermittent. In many cases, the eye turn might only be visible during stressful situations or when the person is tired, ill or anxious.

Hypertropia
Hypertropia

If the hypertropia is a decompensation of a congenital deviation, then treatment may consist of prism glasses and Vision Therapy. Our goal is fusion without prismatic glasses. However, often, treatment requires small amount of prism to hold the eyes in comfortable alignment.

image: quazoo.com
Infantile Esotropia
Infantile Esotropia

What is infantile esotropia? Esotropia is an inward turning of one or both eyes. Infantile esotropia begins at birth or during the first year of life. Infantile esotropia is also called congenital esotropia [See figure 1]. Why does infantile esotropia occur? The cause of infantile esotropia is unknown.

source: aapos.org
image: aao.org

Related Types