A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Strep Throat

Bone Infections
Bone Infections

Strep throat is a bacterial infection that causes inflammation and pain in the throat. Caused by Streptococcus bacteria, this condition is especially common in children between the ages of five and fifteen. We explain the common signs, diagnostic tests, treatment options, and the outlook and potential complications.

image: quora.com
Cellulitis
Cellulitis

Cellulitis does not "cause" strep throat. However, both cellulitis and strep throat can be caused by a bacteria called streptococcus pyogenes (group a strep, aka gas). Gas produces different toxins resulting in symptoms such as fever, malaise, very red skin, and low blood pressure.

source: healthtap.com
Glomerulonephritis
Glomerulonephritis

Post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis (PSGN) is a kidney disease that can develop after infections caused by bacteria called group A Streptococcus or group A strep. These infections include throat and skin infections like strep throat, scarlet fever, and impetigo.

source: cdc.gov
Impetigo
Impetigo

Can you get impetigo from strep throat - Is it possible for me to get strep throat from impetigo? Yes in reverse. Strep throat can spred to wounds and sore and contaminate it to cause impetigo. Saliva/cough-hand contact-scratching skin--impetigo.

source: healthtap.com
Rheumatic Fever
Rheumatic Fever

A rare but potentially life-threatening disease, rheumatic fever is a complication of untreated strep throat caused by bacteria called group A streptococcus. The main symptoms -- fever, muscle aches, swollen and painful joints, and in some cases, a red, lattice-like rash-- typically begin two to four weeks after a bout of strep.

source: webmd.com
image: guardian.ng
Scarlet Fever
Scarlet Fever

Scarlet fever – or scarlatina – is a bacterial infection caused by group A Streptococcus or “group A strep.” These bacteria cause many types of infections, including strep throat and skin infections. Certain strep bacteria produce a toxin (poison) that can cause a red rash—the “scarlet” of scarlet fever.

source: cdc.gov
Streptococcal Pharyngitis (Strep Throat, Fig 2)
Streptococcal Pharyngitis (Strep Throat, Fig 2)

When caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, which are also called group A Streptococcus or group A strep, acute pharyngitis is also known as strep throat. The etiology, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment options, prognosis and complications, and prevention are described below.

source: cdc.gov
Wound Infections
Wound Infections

The risk of spread is greatest when an individual is ill, such as when people have strep throat or an infected wound. Individuals who carry the bacteria but have no symptoms are much less contagious. Treatment of an infected person with an appropriate antibiotic for 24 hours or longer eliminates contagiousness. However, it is important to complete the entire course of antibiotics as prescribed. Household items like plates, cups and toys do not play a major role in disease transmission.

source: health.ny.gov