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Types of Stress Disorders

Acute Time-Limited
Acute Time-Limited

In the weeks after a traumatic event, you may develop an anxiety disorder called acute stress disorder (ASD). ASD typically occurs within one month of a traumatic event. It lasts at least three days and can persist for up to one month. People with ASD have symptoms similar to those seen in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Anticipatory Stress
Anticipatory Stress

However, there are some people who suffer from a condition that is known as anticipatory anxiety, which is a bit different than the anticipation that a lot of us know and understand. As you grow in life, you will start to notice that there will be times when certain events will be disappointing.

Bipolar Disorder
Bipolar Disorder

Some bipolar disorder symptoms are similar to other illnesses, which can make it hard for a doctor to make a diagnosis. In addition, many people have bipolar disorder along with another illness such as anxiety disorder, substance abuse, or an eating disorder. People with bipolar disorder are also at higher risk for thyroid disease, migraine headaches, heart disease, diabetes, obesity, and other physical illnesses.

source: nimh.nih.gov
Brief Naturalistic
Brief Naturalistic

Brief naturalistic stressors are ones that occur naturally in your environment such as taking a test. The stress you experience usually only lasts for the time you ...

Chronic
Chronic

Chronic stress can occur in response to everday stressors that are ignored or poorly managed, as well as to exposure to traumatic events. The consequences of chronic stress are serious, particularly as it contributes to anxiety and depression.

source: apa.org
Distant
Distant

Symptoms of Acute Stress Disorder According to the DSM, “The essential feature of Acute Stress Disorder is the development of characteristic anxiety, dissociative, and other symptoms that occurs within 1 month after exposure to an extreme traumatic stressor” (p. 469).

Dysthymia
Dysthymia

Persistent depressive disorder (PDD) is a serious and disabling disorder that shares many symptoms with other forms of clinical depression. It is generally experienced as a less severe but more chronic form of major depression. PDD was referred to as dysthymia in previous versions of the DSM.

Encounter Stress
Encounter Stress

Reliving a disturbing or traumatic event—a violent encounter, the sudden death of a loved one—is a hallmark of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which shares some features with anxiety disorders.

source: health.com
Generalized Anxiety Disorder
Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Caffeine is a mood-altering drug, and it may make symptoms of anxiety disorders worse. Eat right, exercise, and get better sleep. Brisk aerobic exercises like jogging and biking help release brain chemicals that cut stress and improve your mood. Sleep problems and anxiety disorder often go hand in hand.

source: webmd.com
Major Depression
Major Depression

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. Also called major depressive disorder or clinical depression, it affects how you feel, think and behave and can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems.

Mood Disorder Related to Another Health Condition
Mood Disorder Related to Another Health Condition

A mood disorder is a mental health class that health professionals use to broadly describe all types of depression and bipolar disorders. The most common types of mood disorders are major depression, dysthymia (dysthymic disorder), bipolar disorder, mood disorder due to a general medical condition, and substance-induced mood disorder.

Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD)

Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a type of mental illness. People with OCD can have either obsessive thoughts and urges or compulsive, repetitive behaviors. Some have both obsessions and compulsions.

source: webmd.com
Panic Disorder
Panic Disorder

Turning to drugs or alcohol to try to deal with panic disorder in turn can make the symptoms worse. People with this disorder often also have major depression. But there is no evidence that one condition causes the other.

source: webmd.com
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), once called shell shock or battle fatigue syndrome, is a serious condition that can develop after a person has experienced or witnessed a traumatic or terrifying event in which serious physical harm occurred or was threatened.

source: webmd.com
Situational Stress
Situational Stress

anxiety disorders a group of mental disorders in which anxiety is the most prominent disturbance or in which anxiety is experienced if the patient attempts to control the symptoms. Everyone occasionally experiences anxiety as a normal response to a dangerous or unusual situation.

Social Phobia (or Social Anxiety Disorder)
Social Phobia (or Social Anxiety Disorder)

If you have social anxiety disorder, though, the stress of these situations is too much to handle. You might avoid all social contact because things that other people consider “normal” -- like making small talk and eye contact -- make you so uncomfortable.

source: webmd.com
Stressful Events Sequences
Stressful Events Sequences

Stressful Events Sequences Stressful events sequences happen when there is a traumatic event that causes additional stressors. An example of this is if you are a victim of a natural disaster and then have to deal with the loss of loved ones, belongings, and pulling your life back together.

image: youtube.com
Substance-Induced Mood Disorder
Substance-Induced Mood Disorder

Substance-Induced Mood Disorder is a kind of depression that is caused by using alcohol, drugs, or medications. Substance/Medication-Induced Depressive Disorder is the diagnostic name for alcohol or drug-induced depression.

Time Stress
Time Stress

Acute stress disorder is characterized by the development of severe anxiety, dissociation, and other symptoms that occurs within one month after exposure to an extreme traumatic stressor (e.g., witnessing a death or serious accident).