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Types of Styes

Blepharitis
Blepharitis

Complications from blepharitis include: Stye: A red tender bump on the eyelid that is caused by an acute infection of the oil glands of the eyelid. Chalazion: This condition can follow the development of a stye. It is a usually painless firm lump caused by inflammation of the oil glands of the eyelid.

source: nei.nih.gov
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Blepharospasm
Blepharospasm

What Is Blepharospasm? Many people probably experience blepharospasm without ever realizing it or paying much attention to it. The name is derived from the Greek word blepharon, meaning eyelid, and spasmos, meaning spasm, or uncontrolled contraction. Simply put, it is an abnormal and uncontrollable twitch of the eyelid.

Canaliculitis
Canaliculitis

Canaliculitis can be differentiated from dacryocystitis. In canaliculitis, the punctum and canaliculus are red and swollen; in dacrocystitis, the punctum and canaliculus are normal, but a red, swollen, tender mass involves the lacrimal sac.

source: eye-press.com
Chalazion and Hordeolum (Stye)
Chalazion and Hordeolum (Stye)

A stye (also called a hordeolum) is a small, red, painful lump that grows from the base of your eyelash or under the eyelid. Most styes are caused by a bacterial infection. There are two kinds of styes: External hordeolum: A stye that begins at the base of your eyelash. Most are caused by an infection in the hair follicle. It might look like a pimple.

source: aao.org
image: gopixpic.com
Dacryocystitis
Dacryocystitis

Dacryocystitis is an inflammation or infection of tear sacs. These sacs are the upper portion of the tear ducts that run from the inside the corner of the eye down towards the nasal passages. Tear ducts act as pathways that carry away the tears that have washed away dirt on the surface of the eyes.

Dacryostenosis
Dacryostenosis

A hordeolum (stye) is an acute, localized swelling of the eyelid that may be external or internal and usually is a pyogenic (typically staphylococcal) infection or abscess. Most hordeola are external and result from obstruction and infection of an eyelash follicle and adjacent glands of Zeis or Moll glands.

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Entropion and Ectropion
Entropion and Ectropion

Ectropion Ectropion (eversion of the lower eyelid) is caused by age-related tissue relaxation, cranial nerve VII palsy, and posttraumatic or postsurgical changes. Symptoms are tearing (due to poor drainage of tears through the nasolacrimal system, which may no longer contact the eyeball) and symptoms of dry eyes.

Eyelid and Lacrimal Disorders
Eyelid and Lacrimal Disorders

Chalazia and hordeola (styes) are sudden-onset localized swellings of the eyelid. A chalazion is caused by noninfectious meibomian gland occlusion, whereas a hordeolum usually is caused by infection. Both conditions initially cause eyelid hyperemia and edema, swelling, and pain. With time, a ...

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