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Types of Suns

Main Sequence Star:
Main Sequence Star:

Main sequence stars are stars that are fusing hydrogen atoms to form helium atoms in their cores. Most of the stars in the universe are main sequence stars. The sun is a main sequence star.

source: space.com
Neutron Stars:
Neutron Stars:

Neutron stars are created when giant stars die in supernovas and their cores collapse, with the protons and electrons essentially melting into each other to form neutrons. Credit: NASA/Dana Berry Neutron stars are city-size stellar objects with a mass about 1.4 times that of the sun.

source: space.com
Protostar
Protostar

A protostar is a very young star that is still gathering mass from its parent molecular cloud. The protostellar phase is the earliest one in the process of stellar evolution. For a one solar-mass star it lasts about 1,000,000 years.

Red Dwarf Star:
Red Dwarf Star:

Proxima Centauri, the nearest star to the Sun, is a red dwarf (Type M5, apparent magnitude 11.05), as are fifty of the sixty nearest stars. According to some estimates, red dwarfs make up three-quarters of the stars in the Milky Way.

Red Giant Star:
Red Giant Star:

A red giant star is a dying star in the last stages of stellar evolution. Our own sun will turn into a red giant star, expand and engulf the inner planets, possibly even Earth.

source: space.com
Supergiant Stars:
Supergiant Stars:

Supergiant stars are the largest stars in the universe. They can be thousands of times bigger than our Sun and have a mass up to 100 times greater. The largest known supergiant star, VY Canis Majoris, is up to 2,100 times the size of the Sun (based on upper estimates).

T Tauri Star:
T Tauri Star:

Naked T Tauri star (NTTS), which is a subset of WTTS. Protoplanetary discs in the Orion Nebula Roughly half of T Tauri stars have circumstellar disks, which in this case are called protoplanetary discs because they are probably the progenitors of planetary systems like the Solar System.

White Dwarf Star:
White Dwarf Star:

A white dwarf can also be cannibalized or evaporated by a companion star, causing the white dwarf to lose so much mass that it becomes a planetary mass object. The resultant object, orbiting the former companion, now host star, could be a helium planet or diamond planet.