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Types of Suspension System

Bushings, Bearings, and Joints
Bushings, Bearings, and Joints

Non-load-bearing ball joints, on the other hand, are designed to maintain precise dimensional tolerances in a steering or suspension system. Wear in a non-load-bearing ball joint will cause a noticeable change in the camber, caster or toe angle of a front suspension.

image: carid.com
Electric Power Steering
Electric Power Steering

Electric power steering. More and more power steering systems found in modern cars and trucks are electric, not hydraulic. Electric power steering systems include various sensors, wires, and actuators (motors), any of which can fail, but luckily such failures are less common than failures of hydraulic components.

Excessive Bouncing
Excessive Bouncing

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Hydraulic Power Steering
Hydraulic Power Steering

Fluid can leak from high-pressure lines, delicate valves occasionally wear out, the belt that drives the power steering pump can loosen or break, and eventually the pump itself may fail. Electric power steering. More and more power steering systems found in modern cars and trucks are electric, not hydraulic.

image: skruvat.com
Leaf SpringsTransverse
Leaf SpringsTransverse

A leaf spring is a component of some vehicles’ suspension systems. Specifically, a leaf spring is composed of several (or occasionally just one) thin strips of metal, called leaves, arranged on top of each other to form a single curved piece.

Leaking Fluid
Leaking Fluid

Note that a shock absorber doesn’t actually absorb the shock of a bump; that’s the job of the springs and certain other components of the suspension. Rather, the shock absorber absorbs energy. A vehicle without shocks would keep bouncing up and down for a while after every bump; the shock absorbs the energy of the bouncing.

Linkages
Linkages

We know that any system used in vehicle to reduce road shocks and vibration known as suspension system. Springs, shock absorber torsion bar etc. are components of suspension system. Due to irregularity of roads when a vehicle runs, it feels lot of vibration due to road irregularity and engine vibration.

source: quora.com
image: carid.com
MacPherson Strut/Chapman Strut
MacPherson Strut/Chapman Strut

The Chapman strut is a design of independent rear suspension used for light cars, particularly sports and racing cars. It takes its name from, and is best known for its use by, Colin Chapman of Lotus.

Multi-Link Suspension
Multi-Link Suspension

The multi link suspension is seen as the best independent system for a production car because it offers the best compromises between handling and space efficiency and comfort and handling. Moreover, because such a suspension allows a vehicle to flex more, it's also a very good solution for off road driving.

Nose Dives/Rear End Squats Dipping
Nose Dives/Rear End Squats Dipping

Nose Dives/Rear End Squats Dipping Your car should be steady and stable at all times – whether you are braking, accelerating, or turning – so that you can maintain control as you drive. Shock and struts help keep the car steady.

source: pepboys.com
image: pepboys.com
Semi-Trailing arm Suspension
Semi-Trailing arm Suspension

Semi trailing arm suspension system is good at handling lateral forces to some extent and provides better rolling characteristics than a trailing arm suspension system. On the other hand, a trailing arm suspension provides a very little resistance to lateral forces and can only provide suspension effect for acceleration and braking.

source: quora.com
image: quora.com
Shock Absorbers and Struts
Shock Absorbers and Struts

A strut's internal design is similar to a shock absorber's, but since it's part of the suspension system, it has a different exterior construction. Like shock absorbers, struts leak oil as they age, which leads to the same issues. A strut typically has a coil spring around it.

source: reference.com
Sliding Pillar
Sliding Pillar

Sliding pillar independent suspension was first used by Decauville in 1898, the first recorded instance of independent front suspension on a motor vehicle; in this system, the stub axle carrying the wheel was fixed to the bottom of a pillar which slid up and down through a bush in a transverse axle fixed to the front of the chassis.

Springs
Springs

In some applications, a single “mono-leaf” spring is employed. Although leaf springs are normally used in truck applications with solid drive axles, a transverse leaf spring can be combined with an independently suspended rear axle to form a lightweight rear suspension system in performance road cars.

image: carid.com
Steering System — all Types
Steering System — all Types

Steering system — all types. Every steering systems contains numerous linkages, some joints such as the tie rod ends mentioned above, and some sort of steering box, the mechanical device that converts rotation of the steering wheel into movement of the car’s wheels.

Swing Axle
Swing Axle

A swing axle is a simple type of independent (rear wheel) suspension designed and patented by Edmund Rumpler in 1903. This was a revolutionary invention in the automotive industry, allowing wheels to react to irregularities of road surfaces independently, and enable the vehicle to maintain a strong road holding.

Swinging arm
Swinging arm

A swing arm, or "swinging arm" (UK), originally known as a swing fork or pivoted fork, is the main component of the rear suspension of most modern motorcycles and ATVs. It is used to hold the rear axle firmly, while pivoting vertically, to allow the suspension to absorb bumps in the road.

source: quora.com
image: seelio.com
Tire "Cupping"
Tire "Cupping"

Front tire cupping is a pattern of tire wear that features a series of shallow, scoop-shaped depressions on one side of a tire. Cupping is sometimes difficult to distinguish from the wear pattern caused by unbalanced wheels.

source: reference.com
Upper and Lower A-arm (Double Wishbone)
Upper and Lower A-arm (Double Wishbone)

In automobiles, a double wishbone suspension is an independent suspension design using two (occasionally parallel) wishbone-shaped arms to locate the wheel. Each wishbone or arm has two mounting points to the chassis and one joint at the knuckle.

Wheels and Tires
Wheels and Tires

Suspension System - Introduction • The purpose of the suspension system along with wheels and tires to provide greater handlinggreater handling capabilities as well as

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