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Types of Symmetry Biology

Annelida (Bilateral)
Annelida (Bilateral)

Annelids are segmented worms that belong to the phylum Annelida,such as leeches and earthworms. The type of symmetry that theyexhibit is bilateral symmetry.

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Arthropoda: Dragonfly
Arthropoda: Dragonfly

Arthropoda: Dragonfly | Crayfish; Mollusca (bilateral) An example of the "midplane" in bilateral symmetry. Kingdom Plantae. Bilateral and radial symmetry are also found in the Plant kingdom; symmetry in ggeneral, however, is less significant here that among animals.

Chordata
Chordata

Body Symmetry of Phylum Chordata Although chordates come in many shapes and sizes, they share the four characteristics listed above and they also all have bilateral symmetry. If you divide a chordate in half, you will get two equal pieces that are mirror images of each other.

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Cnidaria (Radial)
Cnidaria (Radial)

Examples of Radial Symmetry. In the plant kingdom, it is common to see radial symmetry in flowers, though the rest of the plant may exhibit other symmetry, or no symmetry at all. Flower petals tend to extend from a central axis into a radial pattern. Fruits frequently have radial symmetry. Think of an orange or apple that has been cut into wedges. The seeds within the fruit are distributed in a radial pattern.

source: study.com
Crayfish
Crayfish

Summary Table of Animal Characteristics. Roundworm: Symmetry: bilateral Tissue Organization: triploblastic Type of Body Cavity: pseudocoelom Digestive Openings: mouth, anus Circulatory System: none Habitat: various; Ascaris is parasitic Respiratory Organs: none (anaerobic) Excretory System: lateral lines Locomotion: crawl with muscle fibers Support System: hydrostatic skeleton

Mollusca (Bilateral)
Mollusca (Bilateral)

Radial symmetry is especially suitable for sessile animals such as the sea anemone, floating animals such as jellyfish, and slow moving organisms such as starfish. Animals in the phyla Cnidaria and Echinodermata are radially symmetric, although many sea anemones and some corals have bilateral symmetry defined by a single structure, the siphonoglyph.

Porifera (no Symmetry)
Porifera (no Symmetry)

Symmetry in biology is the balanced distribution of duplicate body parts or shapes within the body of an organism. In nature and biology, symmetry is always approximate. For example, plant leaves – while considered symmetrical – rarely match up exactly when folded in half.

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