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Types of tbi

Brain Contusion
Brain Contusion

Traumatic brain injury is usually caused by a blow or other traumatic injury to the head or body. The degree of damage can depend on several factors, including the nature of the injury and the force of impact.

Concussion
Concussion

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury—or TBI—caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. This sudden movement can cause the brain to bounce around or twist in the skull, creating chemical changes in the brain and sometimes stretching and damaging brain cells.

source: cdc.gov
Contusions
Contusions

A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury—or TBI—caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. This sudden movement can cause the brain to bounce around or twist in the skull, creating chemical changes in the brain and sometimes stretching and damaging brain cells.

source: cdc.gov
Coup-Contrecoup Brain Injury
Coup-Contrecoup Brain Injury

What is a Coup Contrecoup Brain Injury? 02.27.2017 by Matthew Dolman + | Brain Injuries According to the Brain Injury Association of America an average of 1.5 million people will sustain a traumatic brain injury (TBI) nationwide.

source: dolmanlaw.com
Coup/Contrecoup Lesions
Coup/Contrecoup Lesions

Coup and contrecoup injuries are considered focal brain injuries – those that occur in a particular spot in the brain – as opposed to diffuse injuries, which occur over a more widespread area. Diffuse axonal injury is the most prevalent pathology of coup contrecoup.

image: reddit.com
Diffuse Axonal Injury
Diffuse Axonal Injury

Diffuse axonal injury occurs in about half of all severe head traumas, making it one of the most common traumatic brain injuries. It can also occur in moderate and mild brain injury. A diffuse axonal injury falls under the category of a diffuse brain injury.

Hematoma
Hematoma

Epidural hematoma is seen in 2.7% to 4% of TBI and has an overall mortality of 10%. Cranial fractures are present in 70% to 90% of cases. Symptoms of increased intracranial pressure in epidural hematomas with arterial rupture usually develop within hours after the injury.

Penetrating Injury
Penetrating Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States and is the leading cause of death in persons aged 1-44 years. Approximately 2 million traumatic brain injuries occur each year, and an approximate $25 billion per year is spent in social and medical management of people with such injuries.

Second Impact Syndrome
Second Impact Syndrome

Second Impact Syndrome occurs when a TBI victim receives a second injury before the first one has fully healed. This second impact can cause the already damaged brain tissue to swell inside the skull (a condition known as cerebral edema) which can cause catastrophic brain damage and, in the worse cases, death.

image: bvbia.ca
Shaken Baby Syndrome
Shaken Baby Syndrome

Shaken baby syndrome is a type of traumatic brain injury that occurs when a baby is violently shaken. This often happens in a desperate rage when the baby keeps crying and can't be calmed or soothed. The children who survive being shaken, often have permanent damage.

image: youtube.com
Skull Fractures
Skull Fractures

A skull fracture is a type of injury often seen with moderate or severe TBI, although skull fractures can occur without the brain being injured. Dr. Freeman, what can you tell us about skull fractures? Dr. Freeman Well, Dr. Hemstad, a skull fracture is a crack or break in the bones of the skull, also called the cranial bones. Although the skull is hard and usually provides excellent protection for the brain, a severe impact or blow can cause a fracture.