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Types of tea Leaves

Black tea​
Black tea​

Sun tea, sweet tea, iced tea, afternoon tea…these well-known categories of tea are typically made using black tea. Even the popular English Breakfast and Earl Grey blends are made from black tea leaves.

source: teatulia.com
image: wisegeek.com
Fermented ​tea​
Fermented ​tea​

Fermented tea (also known as post-fermented tea or dark tea) is a class of tea that has undergone microbial fermentation, from several months to many years.

Green tea​
Green tea​

For green tea, the tea leaves are harvested from the Camellia sinensis plant and are then quickly heated—by pan firing or steaming—and dried to prevent too much oxidation from occurring that would turn the green leaves brown and alter their fresh-picked flavor.

source: teatulia.com
Herbal tea​
Herbal tea​

To put it simply...a tea is "only a true tea" if it actually contains tea plant leaves. And thus...this is why oolong, white, green and black are considered "true teas," as their leaves come from the actual tea plant camellia sinensis. By contrast, rooibos and herbal teas do NOT contain leaves from the tea plant.

Oolong​
Oolong​

Made from the leaves, buds and stems of the Camellia sinensis plant, oolong tea is slightly fermented and semi-oxidized, giving it a taste in between black and green tea. There are a wide variety of oolong teas, but the most famous oolong comes from the Fuijan province of China.

source: lifehack.org
White tea​
White tea​

White tea is known to be one of the most delicate tea varieties because it is so minimally processed. White tea is harvested before the tea plant’s leaves open fully, when the young buds are still covered by fine white hairs, hence the name “white” tea.

source: teatulia.com
Yellow tea​
Yellow tea​

Unlike Chinese huángchá, Korean hwangcha is made similarly to oolong tea or lightly oxidized black tea, depending on who makes it – the key feature is a noticeable but otherwise relatively low level of oxidation which leaves the resulting tea liquor yellow in color.

image: jotot.com