A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Textile

Cashmere ​Wool​
Cashmere ​Wool​

Cashmere wool, usually simply known as cashmere, is a luxury fiber obtained from cashmere goats and other types of goat. The word cashmere is an old spelling of Kashmir, the geographical region in north of India and Pakistan.

image: kitairu.net
Hemp​
Hemp​

Hemp fabric or hemp textiles are made from cannabis sativa fiber or industrial hemp. The usage of hemp fiber or cannabis sativa fiber as materials for clothing is not something new. Hemp fiber has been used thousands of years and in fact materials made from hemp were discovered in tombs dating back to 8,000 BC.

Jute​
Jute​

Jute has a long history of use in the sackings, carpets, wrapping fabrics (cotton bale), and construction fabric manufacturing industry. Jute was used in traditional textile machinery as fibers having cellulose (vegetable fiber content) and lignin (wood fiber content).

Linen​
Linen​

Linen has been known to be tolerable for those with allergies and to soothe skin conditions. Cotton and Linen have a long History: Linen textiles are some of the oldest in the world, dating back thousands of years. Egyptians sometimes used linen as currency.

Lyocell​
Lyocell​

Lyocell Fabric What is Lyocell FabricLyocell fabric is an amazing eco friendly fabric that represents a milestone in the development of environmentally sustainable textiles.

Mohair​
Mohair​

Mohair is one of the oldest textile fibers in use. [citation needed] The Angora goat is thought to originate from the mountains of Tibet, reaching Turkey in the 16th century. However, fabric made of mohair was known in England as early as the 8th century.

image: etsy.com
Nylon​
Nylon​

Other kinds of nylon include nylon 6, nylon 6,12, and nylon 5,10. Two other "fantastic plastics" made by DuPont, Kevlar® (a superstrong material used in bulletproof vests) and Nomex® (a fireproof textile used in racing car suits and oven gloves), are also polyamides and they're chemically related to nylon.

Polyester​
Polyester​

Polyester blends have been renamed so as to suggest their similarity or even superiority to natural fibers (for example, China silk, which is a term in the textiles industry for a 100% polyester fiber woven to resemble the sheen and durability of insect-derived silk).

Ramie​
Ramie​

Ramie is one of the oldest fiber crops, having been used for at least six thousand years, and is principally used for fabric production. It is a bast fiber, and the fiber used for textiles comes from the inner bark of the vegetative stalks and not the woody stem or outer bark.

Rayon​
Rayon​

Rayon is a versatile fiber and is widely claimed to have the same comfort properties as natural fibers, although the drape and slipperiness of rayon textiles are often more like nylon. It can imitate the feel and texture of silk, wool, cotton and linen.

Silk​
Silk​

Silk is produced by several insects, like silk worms but generally only the silk of moth caterpillars has been used for textile manufacturing. There has been some research into other types of silk, which differ at the molecular level.

Spandex​
Spandex​

Spandex, Lycra or elastane is a synthetic fiber known for its exceptional elasticity. It is stronger and more durable than natural rubber. It is a polyether-polyurea copolymer that was invented in 1958 by chemist Joseph Shivers at DuPont's Benger Laboratory in Waynesboro, Virginia.

image: alibaba.com
Wool​
Wool​

Wool is the textile fiber obtained from sheep and other animals, including cashmere and mohair from goats, qiviut from muskoxen, angora from rabbits, and other types of wool from camelids. Wool mainly consists of protein together with a few percent lipids.