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Types of Theft

Account Takeover Identity Theft
Account Takeover Identity Theft

Account takeover is a type of identity theft where a fraudster uses parts of the victim’s identity such as an email address to gain access to financial accounts, says Patrick Reemts, vice president of credit risk solutions at ID Analytics in San Diego. The perpetrator often reroutes communication about the account, keeping the victim in the ...

Armed Robbery
Armed Robbery

2.Theft does not involve the presence of a victim while robbery involves the presence of a victim at the time of the robbery. 3.Theft does not involve the use of deadly weapons while Class C felonies and aggravated robbery involve the presence of a deadly weapon.

Character/Criminal ID Theft
Character/Criminal ID Theft

Character/Criminal ID Theft Criminal identity theft is the use of any form of identification to “deceive a law enforcement officer or agency into assigning a criminal act to the name of an identity theft victim” (Biegelman, 2009).

Child Identity Theft
Child Identity Theft

Limiting the Risks of Child Identity Theft Laws safeguard your child and your family's personal information. For example, the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), enforced by the U.S. Department of Education, protects the privacy of student records.

Credit Card Fraud Larceny
Credit Card Fraud Larceny

Minor offenses can result in fines, jail time, or both, but felony-level credit card theft and fraud can lead to prison. Minor offenses can result in fines, jail time, or both, but felony-level credit card theft and fraud can lead to prison.

Criminal Identity Theft
Criminal Identity Theft

All identity theft is a crime under California law, but "criminal identity theft" refers to one type of the crime. Criminal identity theft occurs when someone cited or arrested for a crime uses another person's name and identifying information, resulting in a criminal record being created in that person's name.

source: oag.ca.gov
Debit Card Fraud or Credit Card Fraud
Debit Card Fraud or Credit Card Fraud

How Does Credit Card Fraud Happen? Theft, the most obvious form of credit card fraud, can happen in a variety of ways, from low tech dumpster diving to high tech hacking. A thief might go through the trash to find discarded billing statements and then use your account information to buy things.

image: verastic.com
Driver's License Identity Theft
Driver's License Identity Theft

With so much media attention focused on computer hacking, cybersecurity, and digital identity theft, it’s easy to forget those good old-fashioned thieves can walk away with your identity, too. In this case, it’s something as mundane as losing your wallet or having your purse stolen, but the implications of losing your driver’s license can still have a serious impact on your identity as a whole.

image: ksat.com
Embezzlement
Embezzlement

Differences between theft and embezzlement Theft is the willful stealing of another’s personal property with the specific intent to permanently deprive the other of the possession. Grand theft is when property is taken that is worth more than a minimum amount, in California the minimum amount is $950.

source: wklaw.com
Felony Larceny
Felony Larceny

Felony larceny is a specific type of felony theft crime. In most jurisdictions, larceny is defined as the “unlawful taking and carrying away of the property of another person, with the intent to permanently deprive them of its use.”

image: wklaw.com
Financial ID Theft
Financial ID Theft

The Identity Theft Resource Center maintains a wealth of information for ID theft victims in the form of Fact Sheets which can be found on the ITRC website. These sheets cover a range of topics in various areas of cybercrime, fraud, and scams, as well as outline exactly what the nature of the crime is and what steps you can take if you’ve been a victim.

Financial Identity Theft
Financial Identity Theft

Financial identity theft occurs when someone gains access to your financial information and uses it for their own gain while pretending to be you. The thief could be a stranger who hacked your computer, or could be someone you know who gained access to your personal data at your home.

Fraud
Fraud

Fraud and theft have a lot in common. Both are criminal acts, and both are forcibly taking something from others without asking permission. Both are all about stealing and both are bad things.

Grand Larceny
Grand Larceny

Today, grand larceny is a statutory crime punished by a fine, imprisonment, or both. grand larceny n. the crime of theft of another's property (including money) over a certain value (for example, $500), as distinguished from petty (or petit) larceny in which the value is below the grand larceny limit.

Insurance Identity Theft
Insurance Identity Theft

Identity theft is the act of taking personal information—like Social Security numbers or bank account numbers—and using it to "impersonate" someone for the purpose of stealing. These crimes are usually financial in nature.

source: iii.org
Mail Identity Theft
Mail Identity Theft

Did you know ID Theft is the fastest growing crime in the US and stolen mail is a leading cause of identity theft? Find out how it happens and how to prevent it.

source: mailboss.com
Medical Identity Theft
Medical Identity Theft

Detecting Medical Identity Theft. Read your medical and insurance statements regularly and completely. They can show warning signs of identity theft. Read the Explanation of Benefits (EOB) statement or Medicare Summary Notice that your health plan sends after treatment. Check the name of the provider, the date of service, and the service provided.

Online Shopping Fraud
Online Shopping Fraud

Fraud & Identity Theft » Russian Hackers Aren’t the Only Ones to Worry About: Online Shopping Fraud Report

source: experian.com
Personal Property
Personal Property

Theft. A criminal act in which property belonging to another is taken without that person's consent. The term theft is sometimes used synonymously with Larceny. Theft, however, is actually a broader term, encompassing many forms of deceitful taking of property, including swindling, Embezzlement, and False Pretenses.

Petty Larceny
Petty Larceny

Larceny is a term only used in states that still legally define larceny as different from theft. Larceny is "the unlawful taking, carrying, leading or riding away of property from the possession or constructive possession of another," notes the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program.

source: reference.com
Petty Theft vs Grand Theft
Petty Theft vs Grand Theft

Grand theft is a more severe offense of stealing property, money or an item of higher monetary value and is considered a minor felony in many states. Petty theft is a less serious offense and is often considered a misdemeanor.

source: diffen.com
Receiving Stolen Property
Receiving Stolen Property

Chunchien Lin, 23, of 26 Indian Pond Road, Westboro, is charged with larceny under $250, receiving stolen property under $250 (nine counts), receiving stolen property over $250, receiving stolen credit card, possession of a Class B drug and possession of a Class E drug.

image: dailykos.com
Robbery
Robbery

The crimes of theft, robbery, and burglary are commonly lumped together because most people believe they involve the unlawful taking of someone else’s property. While theft and robbery are very similar crimes that involve the taking or attempted taking of personal property, burglary is slightly different.

image: wisegeek.com
Senior Identity Theft/Senior Scams
Senior Identity Theft/Senior Scams

“Senior Identity Theft: A Problem in This Day and Age” was open to the public. Participants could also submit articles or other written materials in advance of the Forum, which were used by the FTC in understanding the issues surrounding senior identity theft.

source: ftc.gov
Shoplifting
Shoplifting

Shoplifting, theft, larceny, burglary, robbery—what do they all mean? Are they all the same or different? The world of law can be confusing, but it’s imperative to understand legal terms or have a legal professional guide you through the process if you or a loved one has been charged with a crime like shoplifting or theft.So what exactly is the difference between the two?

Social Security Identity Theft
Social Security Identity Theft

1 Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in America. A dishonest person who has your Social Security number can use it to get other personal

source: ssa.gov
image: fedsmith.com
Social Security Number Identity Theft
Social Security Number Identity Theft

If you receive a new Social Security number, you shouldn’t use the old number anymore. For some victims of identity theft, a new number actually creates new problems. If the old credit information isn’t associated with your new number, the absence of any credit history under your new number may make it more difficult for you to get credit.

source: ssa.gov
Synthetic Identity Theft
Synthetic Identity Theft

Synthetic identity theft is the fraudulent use of stolen personally identifiable information (PIF) that is combined with made-up details to create a false identity. The thief may steal an individual's social security number, for example, and use it in conjunction with a false name and address.

Taking and Carrying Away
Taking and Carrying Away

For crimes of theft, a taking w/o consent of the victim Asportation The trespassory taking and carrying away (as of personal property in the crime of larceny or of the victim in kidnapping)

source: quizlet.com
Tax Identity Theft
Tax Identity Theft

Tax-related identity theft occurs when someone uses your stolen Social Security number to file a tax return claiming a fraudulent refund. You may be unaware that this has happened until you efile your return and discover that a return already has been filed using your SSN.

source: irs.gov
Without Permission From the Rightful Owner
Without Permission From the Rightful Owner

Theft is taking something from someone who is the rightful owner without their permission. It doesn’t matter if the rightful owner keeps an original version or not.

image: me.me
Writing bad Checks
Writing bad Checks

Writing a bad check or engaging in check kiting schemes is bank fraud and it carries heavy penalties. The severity of the penalty depends on how the crime is defined in your state. Depending on where you live, the crime can be called anything from check floating to forgery.