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Types of Thought Process

Abductive Reasoning
Abductive Reasoning

TIP Sheet DEDUCTIVE, INDUCTIVE, AND ABDUCTIVE REASONING. Reasoning is the process of using existing knowledge to draw conclusions, make predictions, or construct explanations.

source: butte.edu
Abstraction
Abstraction

Abstract thinking is the ability to think about objects, principles, and ideas that are not physically present. It is related to symbolic thinking, which uses the substitution of a symbol for an object or idea.

Analogical Reasoning
Analogical Reasoning

Analogical reasoning is using an analogy, a type of comparison between two things, to develop understanding and meaning. It's commonly used to make decisions, solve problems and communicate. As a tool of decision making and problem solving, analogy is used to simplify complex scenarios to something that can be more readily understood.

Analytic Reasoning
Analytic Reasoning

In clinical reasoning, analytical thinking is present in deliberately generating and testing of diagnostic hypotheses, in causal reasoning with biomedical knowledge, and in the use of decision tools. The non-analytical system or system 1 is implicit, based on automatic and effortless thought processes and is associative, intuitive and fast.

Backward Induction
Backward Induction

Backward induction is the process of reasoning backwards starting with potential conclusions. The steps that can reach each potential conclusion are mapped out in a backwards fashion. These paths are then evaluated according to your goals.

Cognitive Biases
Cognitive Biases

A cognitive bias is a type of error in thinking that occurs when people are processing and interpreting information in the world around them. The human brain is powerful but subject to limitations. Cognitive biases are often a result of your brain's attempt to simplify information processing.

Cold Logic
Cold Logic

As a result, it is common for logic embedded in processes, rules, practices, validations and algorithms to ignore human factors. This produces suboptimal results that fail to account for social, legal and business realities that are driven by human needs and judgment.

Concrete Thinking vs Abstract Thinking
Concrete Thinking vs Abstract Thinking

Concrete vs Abstract Thinking People always think differently. Some may think in concrete terms and some in abstract terms. Concrete thinking refers to the thinking on the surface whereas abstract thinking is related to thinking in depth.

Convergent Thinking vs Divergent Thinking
Convergent Thinking vs Divergent Thinking

The majority of school tasks also call for convergent thinking. DIVERGENT VS. CONVERGENT THINKING. Given below is a comparison of the two thinking styles with the factors of comparison being mood, creative ability, intellectual ability, brain activity, personality and sleep deprivation.

source: cleverism.com
Creative Thinking vs Analytical Thinking
Creative Thinking vs Analytical Thinking

Critical Thinking, on the other hand, is more evaluative in nature and analyses a particular thing. Hence, one can conclude that while Creative thinking is generative in purpose, Critical Thinking is analytical in purpose. This is one of the main differences between creative thinking and critical thinking.

Sequential (Linear) Thinking vs Holistic Thinking
Sequential (Linear) Thinking vs Holistic Thinking

Cognitive Styles. Different people have different ways of thinking. The concept of cognitive styles addresses this issue, defining different overall patterns of thinking or approaching problems. Analytic vs. Holistic Thinking. One of the most common distinctions in the literature on cognitive style is between analytic and holistic styles.