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Types of Torts

Battery
Battery

Some common examples of intentional torts are assault, battery, trespass, and false imprisonment. FindLaw's Assault, Battery and Intentional Torts section provides information about the various acts that are considered intentional torts and the elements that a victim must prove in order to prevail in his or her case.

Conversion
Conversion

Conversion is a civil claim that can be brought when a party wrongfully takes another’s money or property. Conversion is any act of control wrongfully exerted over another’s personal property. The control exerted must cause an actual interference with one’s ownership or right of possession.

Defamation
Defamation

Defamation is considered to be a civil wrong, or a tort. A person that has suffered a defamatory statement may sue the person that made the statement under defamation law. Defamation law walks a fine line between the right to freedom of speech and the right of a person to avoid defamation.

False Imprisonment
False Imprisonment

Elements of a False Imprisonment Claim. All states have false imprisonment laws to protect against unlawful confinement. To prove a false imprisonment claim in a civil lawsuit, the following elements must be present: There was a willful detention; The detention was without consent; and The detention was unlawful.

Fraud/Deceit
Fraud/Deceit

Such terms as “fraud” are used loosely by most people and are generally meant to include wrongful acts ranging from outright thievery to simply not telling the whole story to someone in order to make a deal happen.

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Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress
Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress

In general, the tort of intentional infliction of emotional distress involves some kind of conduct that is so terrible that it causes severe emotional trauma in the victim. In such cases, the victim can recover damages from the person causing the emotional distress.

Intentional Torts;
Intentional Torts;

Intentional Torts vs. Crimes. Many intentional torts are also crimes. The difference between the two is subtle but very important. A tort --intentional or otherwise -- can result in a civil suit. This is a lawsuit brought by one private citizen against another.

source: nolo.com
Negligence; and
Negligence; and

Negligence (Lat. negligentia) is a failure to exercise appropriate and or ethical ruled care expected to be exercised amongst specified circumstances. The area of tort law known as negligence involves harm caused by failing to act as a form of carelessness possibly with extenuating circumstances.

Strict Liability
Strict Liability

Types of Strict Liability Torts There are instances when a person becomes responsible for things that may go wrong even if the person did not intend for the wrong to occur. In other words, some actions hold a person strictly liable regardless of the circumstances.

source: study.com
Trespass (to Land and Property)
Trespass (to Land and Property)

Trespass to land may occur when a person or object, such as litter, enters the property. Trespass to chattel is an intentional interference with a plaintiff's right of possession to personal property. This may occur if a defendant damages the property or deprives the plaintiff of possession of the property. Nuisance. A nuisance is an unreasonable and substantial interference with the use and/or enjoyment of land that does not involve a physical trespass.

source: inc.com
Trespass to Chattels (Personal Property)
Trespass to Chattels (Personal Property)

Trespass to chattel is an intentional interference with a plaintiff's right of possession to personal property. This may occur if a defendant damages the property or deprives the plaintiff of possession of the property.

source: inc.com
Trespass to Land
Trespass to Land

TRESPASS TO LAND LECTURE DEFINITION. Trespass to land occurs where a person directly enters upon another's land without permission, or remains upon the land, or places or projects any object upon the land. This tort is actionable per se without the need to prove damage.

image: quazoo.com

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