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Types of Triceratops

Achelousaurus​
Achelousaurus​

Achelousaurus is a genus of centrosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous Period of what is now North America, about 74.2 million years ago. The first fossils of Achelousaurus were collected in Montana in 1987, by a team led by Jack Horner, with more finds made in 1989. In 1994, Achelousaurus horneri was described and named by Scott D. Sampson; the generic name means "Achelous lizard", in reference to a Greek mythological figure, and the specific name refers to Horner.

Anchiceratops​
Anchiceratops​

Anchiceratops (/ ˌ æ ŋ k i ˈ s ɛr ə t ɒ p s / ANG-kee-SERR-ə-tops) is an extinct genus of chasmosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur that lived approximately 72 to 71 million years ago during the latter part of the Cretaceous Period in what is now Alberta, Canada.

Aquilops​
Aquilops​

Aquilops americanus was about the size of a small cat, weighing around 1.6 kg and measuring around 60 cm in total length. It is the oldest species of horned dinosaur known from North America, about 40 million years older than the iconic horned dinosaur Triceratops, which weighed up to 4,000 times more.

source: sci-news.com
Arrhinoceratops​
Arrhinoceratops​

Described by William Arthur Parks in 1925, Arrhinoceratops is known from a partially crushed, slightly distorted skull which lacked the lower jaws. The remains were collected from the Neill's Ranch site, along the Red Deer River in Alberta by a 1923 expedition from the University of Toronto. Parks named the type species Arrhinoceratops brachyops.

image: pixshark.com
Avaceratops​
Avaceratops​

Avaceratops, like all ceratopsians, was a herbivore. During the Cretaceous, flowering plants were "geographically limited on the landscape", so it is likely that this dinosaur fed on the predominant plants of the era: ferns, cycads and conifers.

Carnotaurus​
Carnotaurus​

Carnotaurus / ˌ k ɑːr n oʊ ˈ t ɔːr ə s / is a genus of large theropod dinosaur that lived in South America during the Late Cretaceous period, between about 72 and 69.9 million years ago. The only species is Carnotaurus sastrei.

Centrosaurus​
Centrosaurus​

The skull of Triceratops (Wikimedia Commons). Part of what makes Triceratops such a recognizable dinosaur is the enormous size of its skull, which, with its backward-pointing frill, could easily attain a length of over seven feet.

source: thoughtco.com
Ceratopsians​
Ceratopsians​

Triceratops fossils are far and away the most common dinosaur remains found in the latest Cretaceous rocks in the western United States, making up as much as 5/6ths of the large dinosaur fauna in some areas. These facts indicate that some ceratopsians were the dominant herbivores in their environments.

Ceratosaurus​
Ceratosaurus​

Ceratosaurus / ˌ s ɛr ə t oʊ ˈ s ɔːr ə s / (from Greek κέρας/κέρατος, keras/keratos meaning "horn" and σαῦρος/sauros meaning "lizard") was a predatory theropod dinosaur in the Late Jurassic Period (Kimmeridgian to Tithonian).

image: fanpop.com
Chasmosaurinae​
Chasmosaurinae​

Triceratops is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that first appeared during the late Maastrichtian stage of the late Cretaceous period, about 68 million years ago (mya) in what is now North America. It is one of the last known non-avian dinosaur genera, and became extinct in the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago.

Coahuilaceratops​
Coahuilaceratops​

Coahuilaceratops (meaning "Coahuila horn face") is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur. It is a chasmosaurine ceratopsian which lived during the Late Cretaceous period (late Campanian stage) in what is now southern Coahuila in northern Mexico.

image: pixels.com
Diabloceratops​
Diabloceratops​

Diabloceratops / d aɪ ˌ æ b l oʊ ˈ s ɛr ə t ɒ p s / [dee-ab-lo-ser-a-tops] is an extinct genus of centrosaurine ceratopsian dinosaur that lived approximately 79.9 million years ago during the latter part of the Cretaceous Period in what is now Utah, in the United States.

Einiosaurus​
Einiosaurus​

Triceratops species possessed a sturdy build, with strong limbs, short hands with three hooves each, and short feet with four hooves each. Although certainly quadrupedal, the posture of these dinosaurs has long been the subject of some debate.

Eotriceratops​
Eotriceratops​

Estimated size of Eotriceratops (green) beside a Triceratops (blue) and a human The holotype skull has been estimated to have had an original length of around 3 m (9.8 ft). It has been estimated that this specimen had a total length of about 9 m (29.5 ft).

Horned ​Dinosaurs​
Horned ​Dinosaurs​

Although it's by far the most popular, Triceratops was far from the only ceratopsian (horned, frilled dinosaur) of the Mesozoic Era--in fact, more ceratopsians have been discovered in North America over the past 20 years than any other type of dinosaur.

source: thoughtco.com
Kosmoceratops​
Kosmoceratops​

Kosmoceratops richardsoni Sampson et al., 2010 Kosmoceratops (from Ancient Greek κόσμος (kosmos "ornament, decoration"), κέρας (keras, "horn") and ὤψ (ōps, "face")) is a genus of herbivorous chasmosaurine ceratopsian dinosaur, which lived during the Late Cretaceous period (late Campanian) in the part of the island continent Laramidia that is now Utah, United States.

Marginocephalia​
Marginocephalia​

Visitors examine a Triceratops skull in the Valley Life Sciences Building, UC Berkeley campus. Photo by Dave Smith, © UC Museum of Paleontology. The Marginocephalia ("fringed heads") are a clade of extinct herbivorous dinosaurs that inherited a slight shelf or frill at the back of their skull from their common ancestor back in the Early/mid Cretaceous period.

Monoclonius​
Monoclonius​

Triceratops is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur that first appeared during the late Maastrichtian stage of the late Cretaceous period, about 68 million years ago (mya) in what is now North America. It is one of the last known non-avian dinosaur genera, and became extinct in the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event 66 million years ago.

Nasutoceratops​
Nasutoceratops​

Dinosaur Fight Debate. Triceratops VS Nasutoceratops. Important

Pachyrhinosaurus​
Pachyrhinosaurus​

Pachyrhinosaurus (meaning in Greek "thick-nosed lizard", Παχυρινόσαυρος) is an extinct genus of centrosaurine ceratopsid dinosaur from the Late Cretaceous period of North America. The first examples were discovered by Charles M. Sternberg in Alberta, Canada, in 1946, and named in 1950.

Parasaurolophus​
Parasaurolophus​

Parasaurolophus walkeri, from the Dinosaur Park Formation, was a member of a diverse and well-documented fauna of prehistoric animals, including well-known dinosaurs such as the horned Centrosaurus, Chasmosaurus, and Styracosaurus; fellow duckbills Gryposaurus and Corythosaurus; tyrannosaurid Gorgosaurus; and armored Edmontonia, Euoplocephalus and Dyoplosaurus.

Pentaceratops​
Pentaceratops​

Pentaceratops ("five-horned face") is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsid dinosaur from the late Cretaceous Period of what is now North America. Pentaceratops fossils were first discovered in 1921. The genus was named in 1923 when its type species Pentaceratops sternbergii was described.

Protoceratops​
Protoceratops​

Protoceratops was a quadrupedal dinosaur that was partially characterized by its distinctive neck frill at the back of its skull. The frill itself contained two large parietal fenestrae (holes in the frill), while its cheeks had large jugal bones.

Regaliceratops​
Regaliceratops​

Closely related to Triceratops, Regaliceratops was named for its plated frill, which its describers thought looked somewhat like a crown. In 2005, geologist Peter Hews discovered a skull at the Oldman River in Alberta.

image: forbes.com
Styracosaurus​
Styracosaurus​

Styracosaurus was a relatively large dinosaur, reaching lengths of 5.5 metres (18 feet) and weighing nearly 3 tonnes. It stood about 1.8 meters (5.9 feet) tall. Styracosaurus possessed four short legs and a bulky body.

Titanoceratops​
Titanoceratops​

Titanoceratops (meaning "titanic horn face") is a genus of herbivorous ceratopsian dinosaur. It was a giant chasmosaurine ceratopsian that lived during the Late Cretaceous period (late Campanian, 74.7–73.5 Ma, although it could have lived as late as 72.82 Ma) in what is now New Mexico, and the earliest known member of Triceratopsini.

Torosaurus​
Torosaurus​

Torosaurus is distinguished from the contemporary Triceratops by an elongate frill with large openings (fenestrae), long squamosal bones of the frill with a trough on their upper surface, and the presence of five or more pairs of hornlets (epoccipitals) on the back of the frill.

image: snipview.com
Triceratops​
Triceratops​

Triceratops is the best known genus of the Ceratopsidae, a family of large, mostly North American horned dinosaurs. The exact location of Triceratops among the ceratopsians has been debated over the years.

Wendiceratops​
Wendiceratops​

Wendiceratops is one of the oldest known members of the large-bodied horned dinosaurs called Ceratopsidae and was a herbivore. Experts believe it would have used its strange beak to crop low-lying plants and then slice them up with the dozens of leaf-shaped teeth packed into its mouth.

Zuniceratops​
Zuniceratops​

Zuniceratops is an example of the evolutionary transition between early ceratopsians and the later, larger ceratopsids that had very large horns and frills. This supports the theory that the lineage of ceratopsian dinosaurs may have been North American in origin.