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Types of Truss Bridges

Arch
Arch

A truss arch bridge combines the elements of the truss bridge and the arch bridge. The actual resolution of forces will depend upon the design. If no horizontal thrusting forces are generated this becomes an arch-shaped truss, essentially a bent beam – see moon bridge for an example.

image: snipview.com
Cable Stayed
Cable Stayed

Cable-stayed bridges with more than three spans are generally more complex, and bridges of this type generally represent a more notable engineering achievement, even where their spans are shorter. Cable-stayed bridges have the second-longest spans, after suspension bridges, of bridge types.

Camelback Truss Diagram (Source: HAER)
Camelback Truss Diagram (Source: HAER)

Camelback truss diagram (source: HAER) A Camelback truss is a variation of the Parker truss that has a polygonal upper chord of exactly five slopes. This provides some saving of material with the greatest depth of truss where it is most required, at the center of the span.

source: ncdot.gov
image: ncdot.gov
Cantilever
Cantilever

A cantilever bridge is a bridge built using cantilevers, structures that project horizontally into space, supported on only one end.For small footbridges, the cantilevers may be simple beams; however, large cantilever bridges designed to handle road or rail traffic use trusses built from structural steel, or box girders built from prestressed ...

Parker Truss Diagram (Source: HAER)
Parker Truss Diagram (Source: HAER)

North Carolina’s metal truss bridges utilize only about five of the many types or subtypes of metal truss bridges—the Pratt, the Warren, the Parker, the Camelback, and the Pennsylvania. Pratt truss diagram (source: HAER)

source: ncdot.gov
image: ncdot.gov
Pennsylvania Truss Diagram (Source: HAER)
Pennsylvania Truss Diagram (Source: HAER)

North Carolina’s metal truss bridges utilize only about five of the many types or subtypes of metal truss bridges—the Pratt, the Warren, the Parker, the Camelback, and the Pennsylvania. Pratt truss diagram (source: HAER)

source: ncdot.gov
image: ncdot.gov
Pratt Truss Diagram (Source
Pratt Truss Diagram (Source

The Pratt Truss originated from Caleb and Thomas Pratt (father and son) when they applied for a patent in 1844. Interestingly, their patent had less to do with design and more to do with a method for building trusses.

image: ncdot.gov
Suspension
Suspension

In addition to the cables, almost all suspension bridges feature a supporting truss system beneath the bridge deck called a deck truss. This helps to stiffen the deck and reduce the tendency of the roadway to sway and ripple.

image: past-inc.org
Truss
Truss

A truss is a series of individual members, acting in tension or compression and performing together as a unit. On truss bridges, a tension member is subject to forces that pull outward at its ends. Even on a "wooden" truss bridge, these members are often individual metal pieces such as bars or rods. Compressive forces push or compress together and are heavier. The individual members form a triangular pattern.

source: tn.gov
Warren Truss Diagram (Source: HAER)
Warren Truss Diagram (Source: HAER)

Warren truss diagram (source: HAER) The Warren truss design is distinguished by equal-sized members and the ability of some of the diagonals to act in both tension and compression. The type is generally characterized by thick, prominent, diagonal members, although verticals could be added for increased stiffness.

source: ncdot.gov
image: ncdot.gov

Related Types