A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Vegetables

Adzuki Bean
Adzuki Bean

Adzuki bean nutrition is off the charts with loads of fiber and vitamins. The beans are fairly easy to grow but require a long season. This article will provide additional information on growing these beans in the garden.

Artichoke
Artichoke

The artichoke is an immature (at the stage we eat it) thistle. Here's a picture of one cut down the center. In fact the name artichoke is derived from the Turkish word for thistle. When it flowers (here's a link to pictures) it's a nice big purple thistle.

Black-Eyed pea
Black-Eyed pea

The black-eyed pea, black-eyed bean or goat pea, a legume, is a subspecies of the cowpea, grown around the world for its medium-sized, edible bean. The common commercial variety is called the California Blackeye; it is pale-colored with a prominent black spot.

Bok Choy
Bok Choy

Bok choy can also be steamed or boiled, but the stir fry method of cooking seems to release the best flavors. Kimchee is the Korean name for pickled bok choy. When shredded, it makes great coleslaw.

Broad Bean
Broad Bean

800g broad beans, podded and, if large, blanched and popped out of their skins 200ml white wine 1 litre vegetable stock A couple of sprigs of mint, chopped A small handful of parsley, chopped 100g feta, crumbled. 1 Heat the oil and half the butter in a large, heavy-based pan and add the spring onions and garlic.

image: dobies.co.uk
Broccoflower
Broccoflower

Another vegetable that often goes by this name is Romanesco broccoli, an unusual green vegetable that has a unique fractal pattern, resembling tiny pine trees, on its head. Both types of broccoflower are generally milder, more tender, and slightly sweeter than either broccoli or caulifower.

Broccoli
Broccoli

Broccoli is a human innovation, a man-made food, and a result of a mutation selected and cultivated by man. We discuss the roots of broccoli's existence. Broccoli is a human innovation, a man-made food, and a result of a mutation selected and cultivated by man.

Brussels Sprout
Brussels Sprout

The Brussels sprout is a member of the Gemmifera Group of cabbages (Brassica oleracea), grown for its edible buds. The leafy green vegetables are typically 2.5–4 cm (0.98–1.6 in) in diameter and look like miniature cabbages.

Capitata Group
Capitata Group

Brassica oleracea is a plant species that includes many common foods as cultivars, including cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts, collard greens, savoy, kohlrabi, and gai lan. In its uncultivated form, it is called wild cabbage, and is native to coastal southern and western Europe.

Carrot
Carrot

They are scientifically classified as Daucus carota and categorized as a root vegetable. Carrots come in different colors such as orange, purple, white, yellow, and red. The taproot of the carrot is the part of the vegetable most commonly eaten, although the greens are still beneficial in salads and other forms.

Cauliflower
Cauliflower

Cauliflower is one of several vegetables in the species Brassica oleracea in the genus Brassica, which is in the family Brassicaceae. It is an annual plant that reproduces by seed. Typically, only the head is eaten – the edible white flesh sometimes called "curd" (similar appearance to cheese curd).

Celeriac
Celeriac

The Vegetable World's Ugly Duckling: Celeriac Celeriac is the unsung frog prince of winter vegetables. Pare off its warty exterior and you'll uncover the royal vegetable within: a perfect, ivory-fleshed, winter alternative to potatoes and other starches.

source: npr.org
Celery
Celery

Celery lowers cholesterol levels and arthritis pain, helps in weight loss, detoxifies the body, reduces high blood pressure, and promotes overall health in a vast number of ways. It is rich in vitamin C and hence is extremely beneficial for health. What is Celery? Celery is a plant of the Apiaceae family and is consumed as a vegetable.

Chard
Chard

Chard or Swiss chard (Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris, Cicla-Group and Flavescens-Group) (/ tʃ ɑːr d /) is a green leafy vegetable that can be used in Mediterranean cooking. In the cultivars of the Flavescens-Group, the leaf stalks are large and often prepared separately from the leaf blade.

image: dishmaps.com
Chickpea
Chickpea

The chickpea or chick pea is a legume of the family Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae. Its different types are variously known as gram or Bengal gram, garbanzo or garbanzo bean, or Egyptian pea. Its seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes: 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East. In 2016, India produced 64% of the world's total chickpeas.

Collard Greens
Collard Greens

Read the What exactly are collard greens and how do I cook them? discussion from the Chowhound Home Cooking, Collards food community. Join the discussion today. Read the What exactly are collard greens and how do I cook them? discussion from the Chowhound Home Cooking, Collards food community.

source: chowhound.com
Common Bean
Common Bean

The word "bean" and its Germanic cognates (e.g., Bohne) have existed in common use in West Germanic languages since before the 12th century, referring to broad beans and other pod-borne seeds. This was long before the New World genus Phaseolus was known in Europe.

image: pxhere.com
Common Nettle
Common Nettle

Common Nettle is an herbaceous perennial with edible, nutritious leaves. “Is this the same plant that stings?” We’re often asked. “And you can eat it?”

Cranberry Bean
Cranberry Bean

Cranberry beans are an easy to grow plant. Neither pole nor bush beans, the cranberry bean grows on a stalk, which can attain a height of up to 6 feet. Due to this great height, the cranberry bean needs to be staked and grows well planted in a large container, such as a half barrel or even a 1-gallon pot.

Daikon
Daikon

Daikon is a white root vegetable often seen in Japanese and Chinese cuisine that resembles a carrot. However, unlike a carrot's sweetness, daikon is spicy and tart, similar to a radish. Its pungent and sharp flavor can be enjoyed raw, pickled, or cooked.

source: popsugar.com
Eggplant
Eggplant

Eggplant (Solanum melongena) or aubergine is a species of nightshade grown for its edible fruit. Eggplant is the common name in North America, Australia and New Zealand; in British English, it is aubergine, and in South Asia and South Africa, brinjal.

Endive
Endive

Endive is a member of the chicory family, which includes radicchio, escarole, frisee and curly endive. It has a crisp texture and a sweet, nutty flavor with a pleasantly mild bitterness — great served raw or cooked.

source: endive.com
Fennel
Fennel

Editor: Brie, fennel is a bulbous vegetable with a tall, wispy, fronded top that looks rather like dill. The fronds can be used in salads, but the main attraction of fennel is the bulb itself. It's very firm and crunchy, and it tastes a bit like licorice and anise.

source: thekitchn.com
image: today.com
Fiddlehead Fern
Fiddlehead Fern

Fiddleheads or fiddlehead greens are the furled fronds of a young fern, harvested for use as a vegetable. Left on the plant, each fiddlehead would unroll into a new frond (circinate vernation). As fiddleheads are harvested early in the season before the frond has opened and reached its full height, they are cut fairly close to the ground.

Garden Asparagus
Garden Asparagus

Asparagus, or garden asparagus, folk name sparrow grass, scientific name Asparagus officinalis, is a spring vegetable, a flowering perennial plant species in the genus Asparagus.

Garden Rhubarb
Garden Rhubarb

Himalayan rhubarb is also remarkably resistant to pests and diseases. Himalayan rhubarb care is so easy that it makes a great plant for nearly any garden and for all gardening skill levels. It provides yearly ornamental vegetation and flowers, and if you feel so inclined, also provides edible stalks.

Ginger
Ginger

Just because ginger falls into the botanical definition of a vegetable doesn’t mean that you can eat a plate of ginger and say you’ve had your vegetables for the day. Because of its low nutritional value and high flavor, ginger is commonly considered an herb or spice in the culinary world.

Green Bean
Green Bean

Green beans are the unripe, young fruit and protective pods of various cultivars of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Immature or young pods of the runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus), yardlong bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis), and hyacinth bean (Lablab purpureus) are used in a similar way.

Herb
Herb

This recipe recommends a convection oven, but we think that a regular oven will work if you increase the cooking time. Regardless, this is a lovely recipe. Baby carrots, new potatoes and eggplant are tossed in fresh and dried herbs and drizzled with olive oil.

image: etsy.com
Kohlrabi
Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi (German turnip or turnip cabbage; Brassica oleracea Gongylodes Group) is a biennial vegetable, and is a low, stout cultivar of cabbage. Kohlrabi can be eaten raw as well as cooked. Edible preparations are made with both the stem and the leaves.

Leaf Vegetable
Leaf Vegetable

List of leaf vegetables. Some of this article's listed sources may not be reliable. Please help ... Popular as a leaf vegetable particularly in Vietnam ...

Lentil
Lentil

A: According to the USDA, lentils are part of the vegetable group, but they also fall under the protein group — which is why many people consume lentils as a supplement for meat in a vegetarian diet. Lentils are an excellent source of plant protein, and they are also rich in zinc, iron, potassium and folate.

source: reference.com
image: dishmaps.com
Lettuce
Lettuce

Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is an annual plant of the daisy family, Asteraceae. It is most often grown as a leaf vegetable, but sometimes for its stem and seeds. Lettuce is most often used for salads, although it is also seen in other kinds of food, such as soups, sandwiches and wraps; it can also be grilled.

Lima Bean
Lima Bean

They include kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, lima beans, black-eyed peas, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), split peas and lentils. They are available in dry, canned, and frozen forms. These foods are excellent sources of plant protein, and also provide other nutrients such as iron and zinc.

Mung Bean
Mung Bean

All with delicious results! Yogi Bhajan first instructed us to make mungbeans and rice with 1 part mungbeans and 1 part rice with at least 12 parts water, turmeric, onions, garlic, ginger, ghee, and lots of green vegetables. For illness, use more rice (2:1) than mung beans.

Mushroom
Mushroom

Mushrooms are botanically classified as fungi and considered a vegetable for nutrition. They provide a wide range of nutrients, good news for thsoe who love to enjoy mushrooms on pizza and in favorite dishes.

New Zealand Spinach
New Zealand Spinach

Avoid disturbing the soil around the plants when weeding as spinach is shallow rooted. Keep plants well watered during dry periods to promote rapid, uninterrupted growth. Plants need about 1-1 ½ inches of rain per week during the growing season.

source: burpee.com
Okra
Okra

Okra is an allopolyploid of uncertain parentage (proposed parents include Abelmoschus ficulneus, A. tuberculatus and a reported "diploid" form of okra). Truly wild (as opposed to naturalised) populations are not known with certainty and the species may be a cultigen.

Onion
Onion

The onion (Allium cepa L., from Latin cepa "onion"), also known as the bulb onion or common onion, is a vegetable that is the most widely cultivated species of the genus Allium. Its close relatives include the garlic, shallot, leek, chive, and Chinese onion.

Parsley

Parsley or garden parsley (Petroselinum crispum) is a species of flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to the central Mediterranean region (southern Italy, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Malta, Morocco, Algeria, and Tunisia), naturalized elsewhere in Europe, and widely cultivated as an herb, a spice, and a vegetable.

Pea
Pea

The average pea weighs between 0.1 and 0.36 gram. The immature peas (and in snow peas the tender pod as well) are used as a vegetable, fresh, frozen or canned; varieties of the species typically called field peas are grown to produce dry peas like the split pea shelled from the matured pod.

Pinto Bean
Pinto Bean

They include kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, lima beans, black-eyed peas, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), split peas and lentils. They are available in dry, canned, and frozen forms. These foods are excellent sources of plant protein, and also provide other nutrients such as iron and zinc.

Runner Bean
Runner Bean

The word "runner" when applied to beans has two meanings. There are actual runner beans (Phaseolus coccineus), which are a tropical perennial. And there are common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) which "run," that is, grow climbing vines. Most people call those types "pole" or "stick" beans.

image: pixabay.com
Snow pea
Snow pea

Snow Peas . Snow peas are also known as Chinese pea pods since they are often used in stir-fries. They are flat with very small peas inside; the whole pod is edible, although the tough "strings" along the edges are usually removed before eating. Snow peas are mildly flavored and can be served raw or cooked.

source: thekitchn.com
Soybean
Soybean

Health Benefits of Fruits & Vegetables The natural antioxidants in fruits and vegetables will help keep your body working at its best, so consuming a diet that meets your daily recommended amount of fruits and vegetables is one of the best ways to give your body a strong defense against disease.

Spinach
Spinach

Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) is an edible flowering plant in the family Amaranthaceae native to central and western Asia. Its leaves are eaten as a vegetable. It is an annual plant (rarely biennial) growing as tall as 30 cm (1 ft). Spinach may survive over winter in temperate regions.

Split pea
Split pea

The Difference Between Split Peas and Lentils While both are legumes, split peas and lentils come from different varieties of legumes. Split peas are a type of field pea, which is a pea grown specifically for drying, while lentils are their own type of legume, harvested as the seed of the plant and dried.

source: thekitchn.com
Sprouting
Sprouting

Among vegetables, the most common sprouts are in the cabbage (broccoli, cress, mustard and radish) and onion (chive, onion) families, and they have a range of flavors: Mustard sprouts are spicy, broccoli sprouts have a mild pepper flavor, onion sprouts taste like onion with no chopping or crying, and radish sprouts — like daikon or China Rose — offer a hint of heat.