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Types of Walnut Wood

Ash
Ash

Wood Hardness Chart Species ... Ash, Domestic / White ... Bubinga 1980 Ash, Victorian 1010 Butternut 490 Walnut, Domestic Black 1010 Camaru ...

Beech
Beech

What made Walnut wood so popular with both of these industries was the ability to create a high polished finish on the wood after it is shaped into intricate angular designs. The Walnut wood color will vary based on how the wood was dried.

Birch
Birch

Walnut is a straight-grained hardwood that ranges from chocolate brown (when it's from the center of the tree) to yellow (from the outer portion of the tree). A top pick for head-boards, ornate antique-style dining tables, and mantels, walnut is typically clear-coated or oiled to bring out its color.

Cedar
Cedar

Walnut wood is lumber cut from the trees of the Juglans genus. This wood has been popular in the creation of furniture for its strength, coloring and its ability to be shaped into elaborate curves. As was discovered during World War I, Walnut wood is also excellent material to use in the construction of firearm stocks and grips.

image: etsy.com
Cherry
Cherry

Walnut and cherry wood are two different types of hardwoods. Basically, hardwood is the wood that comes from an angiosperm tree. This is a type of tree that has seeds that are enclosed, be it in pods, a shell, a covering or in a fruit.

Fibreboard
Fibreboard

Known as particle board, medium density fiberboard (MDF) or hardboard -- depending on its density -- fiberboard is an engineered product, manufactured by gluing together resins and fibers of hardwood, softwood, or other organic materials, such as hemp or sugar cane.

source: networx.com
Fir
Fir

Walnut. With a hardness of about 4 on a 1 to 5 scale, walnut is a rich brown wood that’s easy to work with. Unfortunately, walnut is somewhat expensive (usually around $8 a board foot), and finding large boards for big projects is getting difficult.

source: dummies.com
Mahogany
Mahogany

The Persian walnut of eastern Europe (Juglans regia) used to be the wood of choice but it is quite rare now. The most popular walnut species for American furniture has been the black walnut, named not just because of the color of the nut shells but because the color of the wood itself can range from light brown to darker, almost purple, brown. It is harder than mahogany, although not as hard as oak, and because it shrinks less than other hardwoods it can survive myriad environments.

Maple
Maple

Maple is a creamy white hardwood that sometimes has a reddish tinge. One of the hardest wood species, maple is often chosen for heavy-use items, like dressers and kitchen cabinets. Pros: Maple is affordable and ultra-durable. It can take a beating and look great for years. Because it takes dark stains well, maple is often stained to mimic a pricier wood, like cherry or mahogany (which is a controversial pick itself because of deforestation in the regions where it's harvested).

Oak
Oak

Oak is very beautiful, natural looking wood with warm honey tones. Oak flooring has traditional appearance therefore blends well with existing oak furniture. It is cheaper than walnut and softer of the two floors. Because two major types are white and red oak, it comes in variety of colours to choose from.

Pine
Pine

Walnut is a straight-grained hardwood that ranges from chocolate brown (when it's from the center of the tree) to yellow (from the outer portion of the tree). A top pick for head-boards, ornate antique-style dining tables, and mantels, walnut is typically clear-coated or oiled to bring out its color.

Redwood
Redwood

Walnut is a beautiful, strong and versatile wood. It comes from a moderate size tree which grows to be about 100 feet tall, with a trunk that can be up to 60″ in diameter. The wood ranges in color from light to dark brown to chocolate brown. The color of walnut varies from species to species and is also affected by the area in which it grows. Walnut wood is warm and rich in color and finishes well.

Walnut
Walnut

Walnut is also frequently used as a marker material in conjunction with a lighter wood such as maple. Look for these walnut markers in bowling alley lanes, as a material on chess and checker boards, butcher blocks tops and marquetry inlays.

source: hunker.com
image: rocadsm.com