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Types of Water Snakes

Banded Water ​Snake​
Banded Water ​Snake​

Banded water snakes have square markings on the sides of their bellies and a dark stripe from their eyes to their jaws. Brown water snake (Nerodia taxispilota) Like banded water snakes, brown water snakes are found along the Southeastern United States’ coastal plain from the Carolinas to Alabama.

Brazos Water ​Snake​
Brazos Water ​Snake​

Brazos River Water Snake Control (Nerodia harteri) Many water snakes are actually harmless, despite the fears raised by the cottonmouth or water moccasin. Brazos River water snakes are one of those harmless-to-humans nonvenomous water snakes.

Brown Water ​Snake​
Brown Water ​Snake​

Brown water snake (Nerodia taxispilota) Like banded water snakes, brown water snakes are found along the Southeastern United States’ coastal plain from the Carolinas to Alabama. They can be large snakes, with females reaching lengths of 5 feet (1.5 m). Males can be as small as 2.5 feet (76 centimeters).

Mississippi ​Green Watersnake​
Mississippi ​Green Watersnake​

N. cyclopion differs from most other species of North American water snakes by having one or more small scales under the eye, giving the appearance of a ring of small plates around the eye, a character shared only with the species N. floridana. A heavy-bodied snake, N. cyclopion is dark green, olive, or brown dorsally.

Nerodia ​Clarkii​
Nerodia ​Clarkii​

Nerodia clarkii, commonly known as ... Some sources consider the three races of N. clarkii to be subspecies of the southern water snake, Nerodia fasciata. ...

Nerodia ​Paucimaculata​
Nerodia ​Paucimaculata​

Nerodia paucimaculata, commonly known as the Concho water snake, is a species of mostly aquatic, nonvenomous colubrid snake native to Texas in the United States

Nerodia ​Rhombifer​
Nerodia ​Rhombifer​

Nerodia rhombifer, commonly known as the diamondback water snake, is a species of nonvenomous natricine colubrid endemic to the central United States and northern Mexico. There are three recognized subspecies of N. rhombifer, including the nominotypical subspecies.

Northern ​Copperbelly Water Snake​
Northern ​Copperbelly Water Snake​

Only a couple hundred snakes remain in the northern population segment. This ongoing decline can be attributed, in part, to: Habitat Loss and Fragmentation. Wetlands used by copperbelly water snakes have been altered by people for agriculture, roads, housing, flood control, and other development.

source: fws.gov
image: flickr.com
Northern ​Water Snake​
Northern ​Water Snake​

The northern water snake is found throughout eastern and central North America, from southern Ontario and southern Quebec in the north, to Texas and Florida in the south. It has been introduced in California where it is considered an invasive species likely to compete with native giant garter snakes Thamnophis gigas.

Plain-Bellied ​Water Snake​
Plain-Bellied ​Water Snake​

Plain-Bellied Water Snake Control (Nerodia erythrogaster) Many water snakes are actually harmless, despite the fears raised by the cottonmouth or water moccasin. Plain-bellied water snakes are one of those harmless-to-humans, nonvenomous water snakes.