A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Waterfowl

Anas​
Anas​

Anseriformes is an order of birds that comprise about 180 living species in three families: Anhimidae (the screamers), Anseranatidae (the magpie goose), and Anatidae, the largest family, which includes over 170 species of waterfowl, among them the ducks, geese, and swans.

Anatinae​
Anatinae​

waterfowl definition : waterfowl Anseriformes is an order of birds that comprise about 180 living species in three families: Anhimidae (the screamers), Anseranatidae (the magpie goose), and Anatidae, the largest family, which includes over 170 species of waterfowl, among them the ducks, geese, and swans.

image: flickr.com
Anserinae​
Anserinae​

Anseriformes is a well-known order containing highly aquatic birds, including ducks, geese, swans, and screamers. These species are found worldwide, with, of course, the exception of Antarctica. Most Anseriformes share several characteristics in common.

source: angelfire.com
Barnacle ​Goose​
Barnacle ​Goose​

About the Barnacle Goose Breeding. Barnacle geese breed along the northeast coast of Greenland, Svalbard, Norway, Novaya Zemlya, and adjacent Vaygach Island, Russia. There are no breeding records of barnacle geese in North America. Barnacle geese nest in small colonies among rocky crags or on cliffs and islands and lay an average of 4-6 eggs.

source: ducks.org
image: ducks.org
Black-Bellied ​Whistling Duck​
Black-Bellied ​Whistling Duck​

The black-bellied whistling duck (Dendrocygna autumnalis), formerly also called black-bellied tree duck, is a whistling duck that breeds from the southernmost United States and tropical Central to south-central South America.

image: audubon.org
Blue-Winged ​Teal​
Blue-Winged ​Teal​

Blue-winged teal are generally the first ducks south in the fall and the last north in the spring. They migrate from the Prairie Pothole Region to wintering areas in Florida, the Caribbean Islands, the Gulf Coast of Texas and Louisiana, Mexico and Central and South America.

source: ducks.org
Bufflehead​
Bufflehead​

About the Bufflehead Breeding. Buffleheads breed from southern Alaska through the forested areas of western Canada, central Ontario and eastern Quebec.

source: ducks.org
Canada ​Goose​
Canada ​Goose​

The Giant Canada goose is the largest goose in the world, with some individuals weighing more than 20 pounds. They can also be long-lived, with a banded giant Canada goose at 30 years and 4 months currently holding the longevity record for waterfowl. Population. In general, populations of Canada geese are currently more stable than in previous decades.

source: ducks.org
Canvasback​
Canvasback​

The canvasback population is continuing to rebound from the low levels experienced in the late 1980s and early 1990s caused by loss of breeding and wintering habitat and lead poisoning due to ingestion of spent shot while feeding (this threat should gradually disappear with the lead shot ban).

source: ducks.org
image: audubon.org
Common ​Eider​
Common ​Eider​

Common eiders are the largest duck found in the northern hemisphere. They are stocky, thick-necked birds that hold their heads below body level during flight. Male common eiders have a primarily white head, neck, chest and back. The breast, belly, sides, rump, tail coverts and tail are black.

source: ducks.org
image: audubon.org
Common ​Goldeneye​
Common ​Goldeneye​

Common goldeneyes breed across the forested areas of Canada, Minnesota, Michigan, Alaska and the northeastern United States. They are most abundant among lakes of the Canadian Boreal Forests, especially where lakes or deep marshes have substantial invertebrate populations.

source: ducks.org
Common ​Merganser​
Common ​Merganser​

About the Common Merganser Breeding Common mergansers breed from Alaska, the southern Yukon, Labrador, and Newfoundland south to central California, Arizona, New Mexico, southern Chihuahua and east of the Rockies to Minnesota, Michigan, New York, New England and Nova Scotia.

source: ducks.org
Common ​Pochard​
Common ​Pochard​

Ring-necked ducks have a wide breeding range across forested regions of Canada and are the most common breeding pochard in the east. Of North American pochards, only scaup are truly abundant, with populations in the range of common dabbling ducks.

source: ducks.org
Common ​Shelduck​
Common ​Shelduck​

The Common Shelduck is a beautiful sharp-coloured duck, which is common in the coastal region, especially on the islands of the Wadden Sea. The Shelduck has a preference to breed in abandoned rabbit holes. Once the young are large enough, the Shelduck family walks to the open water.

Cygnini​
Cygnini​

Study 8 Characteristics of Waterfowl flashcards from Scott S. on StudyBlue.

source: studyblue.com
image: tradebit.com
Diving Duck​
Diving Duck​

The northern-dwelling sea ducks include three species each of eiders, scoters, and mergansers, as well as the long-tailed duck, harlequin duck, two species of goldeneyes, and bufflehead. Although stifftails, pochards, and sea ducks all dive for food, there are as many differences among them as similarities.

source: ducks.org
image: squignet.com
Egyptian ​Goose​
Egyptian ​Goose​

The Egyptian goose (Alopochen aegyptiaca) is a member of the duck, goose, and swan family Anatidae. It is native to Africa south of the Sahara and the Nile Valley. Egyptian geese were considered sacred by the Ancient Egyptians, and appeared in much of their artwork.

Eider​
Eider​

Common eiders are circumpolar in their range, breeding along the coastline of Alaska, nearly the entire coastline of Hudson Bay and eastern Canada, as well as the northern coast of Maine. They typically nest on islands or the coastline. Nesting habitat varies from open areas or in grasses and weeds ...

source: ducks.org
Eurasian Teal​
Eurasian Teal​

The Eurasian teal or common teal (Anas crecca) is a common and widespread duck which breeds in temperate Eurasia and migrates south in winter. The Eurasian teal is often called simply the teal due to being the only one of these small dabbling ducks in much of its range.

Eurasian ​Wigeon​
Eurasian ​Wigeon​

About the Eurasian Wigeon Breeding. Eurasian wigeons breed from Iceland, the British Isles, and Scandinavia east to eastern Siberia and Kamchatka, and south to northern Europe, central Russia and northern China. There are no breeding records of Eurasian wigeons in North America.

source: ducks.org
Gadwall​
Gadwall​

Gadwall are distributed throughout the southern two-thirds of the United States in winter, with the greatest concentrations found in the Central and Mississippi flyways. They are found throughout much of the intermountain west of North America, and most of Mexico, in reservoirs, farm ponds and coastal fresh and brackish marshes.

source: ducks.org
Garganey​
Garganey​

Waterfowl; Statistics Length: 39cm Wingspan: 62cm Weight: 380g. Conservation status. ... The Garganey is a small dabbling duck, slightly larger than a Teal.

Goldeneyes​
Goldeneyes​

Brand new cutting edge waterfowl and hunting apparel out of Jacksonville, FL.

Greater Scaup​
Greater Scaup​

About the Greater Scaup Breeding. Greater scaup breed on the tundra and in the Boreal Forest zones from Iceland across northern Scandinavia, northern Russia, northern Siberia and the western North American Arctic. It is estimated that three-quarters of the North American population breeds in Alaska.

source: ducks.org
Green-Winged ​Teal​
Green-Winged ​Teal​

About the Green-winged Teal Breeding. Green-winged teal breed from Alaska, across Canada, into the Maritime Provinces, south into central California, Utah, Colorado, Nebraska, Minnesota and Wisconsin.

source: ducks.org
Grey Geese​
Grey Geese​

The waterfowl genus Anser includes all grey geese and usually the white geese too. It belongs to the true geese and swan subfamily (Anserinae). The genus has a Holarctic distribution, with at least one species breeding in any open, wet habitats in the subarctic and cool temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere in summer.

Greylag ​Goose​
Greylag ​Goose​

The greylag goose (Anser anser) is a species of large goose in the waterfowl family Anatidae and the type species of the genus Anser. It has mottled and barred grey and white plumage and an orange beak and pink legs.

Harlequin ​Duck​
Harlequin ​Duck​

About the Harlequin Duck Breeding. The Harlequin's range is divided into two separate and distinct regions: the Atlantic Coast and the Pacific Coast. The Atlantic population breeds from Baffin Island, Greenland and Iceland through central and eastern Quebec, eastern Labrador and northern Newfoundland.

source: ducks.org
image: tringa.org
Hooded ​Merganser​
Hooded ​Merganser​

The hooded merganser (Lophodytes cucullatus) is a species of small duck. It is the only extant species in the genus Lophodytes. The genus name derives from the Greek language: lophos meaning 'crest', and dutes meaning diver.

Long-Tailed ​Duck​
Long-Tailed ​Duck​

About the Long-Tailed Duck Breeding. The long-tailed duck has a circumpolar polar distribution. In North America it breeds along the Arctic Coast from Alaska to Greenland and throughout the Canadian tundra. Long-tailed ducks often nest in clusters on nearby offshore islands and coastal tundras. Long-tailed hens lay an average of 7 eggs.

source: ducks.org
Mallard​
Mallard​

The mallard is the most common duck in the United States, with the greatest abundance between the Appalachian and Rocky mountains. Mallard populations have benefited greatly from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and other grassland restoration efforts in the northern Prairies of the United States, where populations have continued to increase.

source: ducks.org
Mandarin ​Duck​
Mandarin ​Duck​

The mandarin duck (Aix galericulata) is a perching duck species found in East Asia. It is medium-sized, at 41–49 cm (16–19 in) long with a 65–75 cm (26–30 in) wingspan. It is closely related to the North American wood duck, the only other member of the genus Aix.

image: uniprot.org
Muscovy Duck​
Muscovy Duck​

The Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) is a large duck native to Mexico, Central, and South America. Small wild and feral breeding populations have established themselves in the United States, particularly in Florida, Louisiana, and the lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas as well as in many other parts of North America, including southern Canada.

Northern ​Pintail​
Northern ​Pintail​

Northern pintails are among the first ducks to migrate south in the fall and north in the spring. Over half of the pintail population in North America migrates through California. The majority of these birds winter in the Central Valley of California, but some continue south to the west coast of Mexico.

source: ducks.org
Northern ​Shoveler​
Northern ​Shoveler​

Northern shovelers fly from the Prairie Pothole Region through the Pacific or Central Flyways, with major stopover areas in the Great Salt Lake, Malheur Basin and Carson Sink. They winter in California; coastal Louisiana, Texas, and Mexico; and the north and central highlands of Mexico.

source: ducks.org
Red-Crested ​Pochard​
Red-Crested ​Pochard​

The red-crested pochard (Netta rufina) is a large diving duck. The scientific name is derived from Greek Netta "duck", and Latin rufina, "golden-red" (from rufus, "ruddy"). Its breeding habitat is lowland marshes and lakes in southern Europe and Central Asia, wintering in the Indian Subcontinent and Africa.

Redhead​
Redhead​

The redhead goes by many names, including the red-headed duck and the red-headed pochard. This waterfowl is easily distinguished from other ducks by the male’s copper coloured head and bright blue bill during the breeding season.

image: ducks.org
Ring-Necked ​Duck​
Ring-Necked ​Duck​

About the Ring-necked Duck Breeding Ring-necked ducks breed from southeastern and east-central Alaska, central British Columbia eastward through northern Saskatchewan to Newfoundland, and south to northeastern California, southeastern Arizona, southern Colorado, Iowa, Illinois, northern New York and Massachusetts.

source: ducks.org
image: audubon.org
Ruddy Duck​
Ruddy Duck​

The ruddy duck (Oxyura jamaicensis) is a duck from North America and one of the stiff-tailed ducks. The genus name is derived from Ancient Greek oxus, "sharp", and oura, "tail", and jamaicensis is "from Jamaica". The Andean duck was considered a subspecies.

Ruddy ​Shelduck​
Ruddy ​Shelduck​

The ruddy shelduck (Tadorna ferruginea), known in India as the Brahminy duck, is a member of the family Anatidae. It is a distinctive waterfowl, 58 to 70 cm (23 to 28 in) in length with a wingspan of 110 to 135 cm (43 to 53 in).

Scoter​
Scoter​

The surf scoter hen can be differentiated from the black scoter by the more sloping forehead and white face patches. Food Habits. The surf scoter feeds mainly on mollusks; crustaceans; aquatic insects; small fish and on green plant matter such as pondweeds, wild celery, muskgrass and the seeds of sedges and bulrushes.

source: ducks.org
Seaducks​
Seaducks​

Higdon Battleship Super Magnum Foam Filled Blue Bill Duck Decoys 6 Pack

source: mackspw.com
Shelducks​
Shelducks​

Paradise Shelducks are very colorful, large, goose-like ducks. Unlike most ducks, the female, with her white head and neck and a chestnut-colored body, is more eye-catching than the male, who sports a dark gray body and black head with occasional green iridescence.

Smew​
Smew​

The waterfowl family is represented in Washington by two distinct groups—the geese and swans, and the ducks. Whistling-ducks are also considered a distinct subfamily, and, although they have not been sighted in Washington in many years, Fulvous Whistling-Ducks have been recorded historically in Washington and remain on the official state checklist.

source: birdweb.org
Snow Goose​
Snow Goose​

Lesser snow geese historically migrate from their northern breeding grounds down the Pacific and Mississippi Flyways, to winter in the Central Valley of California and the Gulf Coast of Texas, Louisiana, and Mexico.

source: ducks.org
Tufted Duck​
Tufted Duck​

The tufted duck (Aythya fuligula) is a small diving duck with a population of close to one million birds. The scientific name is derived from Ancient Greek aithuia an unidentified seabird mentioned by authors including Hesychius and Aristotle, and Latin, fuligo "soot" and gula "throat".

Typical ​Mergansers​
Typical ​Mergansers​

The common merganser (North American) or goosander (Eurasian) (Mergus merganser) is a large duck of rivers and lakes in forested areas of Europe, northern and central Asia, and North America. The common merganser eats fish and nests in holes in trees.

image: audubon.org
Whistling ​Duck​
Whistling ​Duck​

Fulvous whistling ducks, with their long necks and legs, short tail and broad wings, also look much more like a goose than a duck. They are very agile on land, standing erect and walking without the waddle so characteristic of other ducks. A tawny brown head, chest, breast and belly distinguish fulvous whistling ducks.

source: ducks.org
Wigeons​
Wigeons​

About the American Wigeon Breeding. American Wigeon nest farther north than any other dabbling duck with the exception of the northern pintail. They breed throughout northern Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba, Alaska, and the Northwest Territories.

source: ducks.org
image: flyways.us
Wood Duck​
Wood Duck​

About the Wood Duck Breeding Wood ducks breed across most of the central and eastern United States, southeastern Canada and along the Pacific coast from California to British Columbia.

source: ducks.org