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Types of Wild Berries

Acai Berries
Acai Berries

The acai (ah-sigh-EE) berry is a grapelike fruit harvested from acai palm trees, which are native to the rainforests of South America. Like other berries, acai berries contain antioxidants and fiber.

Bayberry
Bayberry

The waxy gray "berries" of the North American wild or cultivated bayberry shrubs (chiefly Myrica cerifera) are used to make fragrant bayberry candles, scented soap, and sealing wax; bayberry is also called candleberry and wax myrtle.

Bilberries
Bilberries

First of all, while blueberries are cultivated in bushes in various places around the world, wild bilberries grow on small shrubs and mainly at the northern parts of the Northern Hemisphere (known as the taiga zone and the subarctic zone).

Black Raspberry
Black Raspberry

Black raspberries are a small, black-colored raspberry covered with very small hairs (much like a raspberry). Blackberries are usually larger, with bigger "cells." Blackberries are sometimes described as shinier than black raspberries.

Blackberry
Blackberry

Blackberry plants and raspberry plants are very similar in appearance and closely related, but there are distinguishing characteristics. Whether you are identifying blackberries for eradication or looking for tasty berries in the wild, identification is important.

Blueberries
Blueberries

Wild blueberries are much smaller than their big, juicy cultivated cousins; maybe less than half the size. So, though perhaps 80 or 90 cultivated blueberries may fit in one cup, that same size cup will hold more than 150 wild blueberries — and that means the wild blueberries benefits are, technically, greater.

Blueberries The Blueberry is an Antioxidant Powerhouse
Blueberries The Blueberry is an Antioxidant Powerhouse

Valued for its high levels of antioxidants, some nutritionists believe that if you make only one change to your diet, it should be to add blueberries. Die-hards claim blueberries can help protect against heart disease and some cancers, as well as improve your memory.

source: nhs.uk
Boysenberry
Boysenberry

The boysenberry /ˈbɔɪzənbɛri/ is a cross among the European raspberry, European blackberry, American dewberry, and loganberry. It is a large 8.0-gram aggregate fruit, with large seeds and a deep maroon color.

image: flickr.com
Cherries
Cherries

Manzanita bushes grow on the West coast of the U.S. and its berries are silvery-green ovals. If you popped one in your mouth, it would taste pretty vile, since the berries are full of tannin, but there are many historical records of Native Americans and Europeans using Manzanita berries to make cider.

Cloudberry
Cloudberry

Cloudberry is a delicious fruit that comes from a rhizomatous herb scientifically known as Rubus chamaemorus. Many people are unfamiliar with cloudberries because they primarily grow in arctic or alpine environments, as well as in boreal forests in the northern hemisphere.

image: shelf3d.com
Cranberries
Cranberries

Cranberries are harvested in the fall when the fruit takes on its distinctive deep red color. Berries that receive sun turn a deep red when fully ripe, while those that do not fully mature are a pale pink or white color. This is usually in September through the first part of November.

Dewberry
Dewberry

The leaves can be used to make a tisane, and the berries are edible and taste sweet. They can be eaten raw, or used to make cobbler, jam, or pie. Around March and April, the plants start to grow white flowers that develop into small green berries. The tiny green berries grow red and then a deep purple-blue as they ripen.

Elderberry
Elderberry

Habitat: Elderberry prefers moist soil but tolerates dry soil as well. It grows best in full sun. It is native to a large area of North America, east of the Rocky Mountains. They grow wild in parts of Mexico and Central America. Edible parts: The berries and flowers are edible. Flowers can be tossed into a salad.

Goji Berries
Goji Berries

Goji berries contain a chemical component called beta-sitosterol. This can help decrease the size of overgrown cells and can cause apoptosis, or “cell suicide” in tumor cells. But according to the National Health Services (NHS) in the United Kingdom, these studies are poorly designed, or have inconclusive and insignificant results.

image: youtube.com
Gooseberry
Gooseberry

The Indian gooseberry (Emblica officinalis, or amla) is light green and extremely bitter. The Cape gooseberry - sometimes called a Peruvian cherry - is yellow-orange and surrounded by a paper-thin husk that falls off as it dries. In the U.S., fresh gooseberries are usually ripe for the picking around July; red berries are generally sweeter.

Grapes
Grapes

Picking your own food in the wild produces no easier or tastier result than it does with berries. And there's more than you might think out there, both in terms of sheer volume and types. Here's how to find the good ones.

source: gizmodo.com
image: flickr.com
Huckleberry
Huckleberry

Wild huckleberry in the Mount Hood National Forest in Oregon. Huckleberry is a name used in North America for several plants in the family Ericaceae, in two closely related genera: Vaccinium and Gaylussacia.

Lingonberry
Lingonberry

Lingonberries, known by the scientific name Vaccinium vitis-idaea, are to Scandinavians what blackberries are to Americans. They are an abundant wild fruit free for the taking by anyone with a basket, a harvesting fork, and the patience to pick through and clean their harvest.

Mulberry
Mulberry

Health benefits of mulberries include their ability to improve digestion and eye health, lower cholesterol, aid in weight loss, boost immunity, and lower blood pressure. Health benefits of mulberries include their ability to improve digestion and eye health, lower cholesterol, aid in weight loss, boost immunity, and lower blood pressure.

Raspberry
Raspberry

While wild and cultivated raspberry plants are quite similar, the fruit produced by wild raspberries differs slightly from the cultivated fruit because the growing conditions are often less than ideal for this berry bush.

Salmonberry
Salmonberry

Rubus spectabilis is a shrub growing to 1–4 m (40-160 inches or 1.3-13.3 feet) tall, with perennial, not biennial woody stems that are covered with fine prickles. The leaves are trifoliate (with three leaflets), 7–22 cm (2.8-8.8 inches) long, the terminal leaflet larger than the two side leaflets.

Strawberry
Strawberry

Picking wild strawberries, black berries, muscadine grapes and wild plums among other fruits was important, as these were future preserves, jams, jellies and fresh pies. etc.. Also there was a lot of home made wine.

White and Golden Raspberry
White and Golden Raspberry

White and Golden Raspberry Raspberries, like blackberries and many other thorny berries, are members of the Rosaceae family—just like roses. The raspberry family includes dozens of different varieties, which vary in color from very pale (almost white) to golden, blue, red, and black.

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