A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Winds

Bora
Bora

The bora is a northern to north-eastern katabatic wind in the Adriatic Sea. Similar nomenclature is used for north-eastern winds in other littoral areas of eastern Mediterranean and Black Sea basins.

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Chinook Wind
Chinook Wind

Chinook winds / ʃ ɪ ˈ n ʊ k /, or simply Chinooks, are föhn winds in the interior West of North America, where the Canadian Prairies and Great Plains meet various mountain ranges, although the original usage is in reference to wet, warm coastal winds in the Pacific Northwest.

Etesian
Etesian

'periodic winds'; sometimes found in the Latin form etesiae), meltemia (Greek: μελτέμια; pl. of μελτέμι meltemi), or meltem are the strong, dry north winds of the Aegean Sea, which blow from about mid-May to mid-September. The Etesian winds are a dominant weather influence in the Aegean Basin.

Foehn Wind
Foehn Wind

Winds of this type are also called "snow-eaters" for their ability to make snow and ice melt or sublimate rapidly. This is a result not only of the warmth of foehn air, but also its low relative humidity. Accordingly, foehn winds are known to contribute to the disintegration of ice shelves in the polar regions.

Khamsin
Khamsin

Khamsīn, chamsin or hamsin (Arabic: خمسين‎‎ khamsīn, "fifty"), more commonly known in Egypt as khamaseen (Egyptian Arabic: خماسين‎‎ khamasīn, IPA: ), is a dry, hot, sandy local wind, blowing from the south, in North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula.

Mistral
Mistral

The mistral (Catalan: Mestral, Greek: Μαΐστρος, Italian: Maestrale, Croatian: Maestral) is a strong, cold, northwesterly wind that blows from southern France into the Gulf of Lion in the northern Mediterranean, with sustained winds often exceeding 66 km/h (41 mph), sometimes reaching 185 km/h (115 mph).

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Sirocco
Sirocco

Sirocco winds with speeds of up to 100 kilometres per hour (54 knots) are most common during autumn and spring. They reach a peak in March and in November when it is very hot. When combined with a rising tide, the sirocco can cause the acqua alta phenomenon in the Venetian Lagoon.

Williwaw
Williwaw

Williwaw Location: Strait of Magellan and Aleutian Islands Williwaw is the name for a sudden violent, cold, katabatic gust of wind descending from a mountainous coast of high latitudes to the sea and are most common n the Strait of Magellan or the Aleutian Islands.

Zonda Wind
Zonda Wind

Zonda wind (Spanish: viento zonda) is a regional term for the foehn wind that often occurs on the eastern slope of the Andes, in Argentina. The Zonda is a dry wind (often carrying dust) which comes from the polar maritime air, warmed by descent from the crest, which is approximately 6,000 m (20,000 ft) above sea level.

image: snipview.com