A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Types of Yarn

Alpaca
Alpaca

Alpaca fiber is naturally water-repellent and difficult to ignite. Huacaya, an alpaca that grows soft spongy fiber, has natural crimp, thus making a naturally elastic yarn well-suited for knitting. Suri has no crimp and thus is a better fit for woven goods.

image: craftsy.com
Angora
Angora

It's rare to find 100% angora yarns, and Plymouth Angora is just that. This worsted weight angora yarn is great for adding interest to your projects, or use it alone for stunning accessories.

source: yarn.com
Cashmere
Cashmere

Cashmere wool, usually simply known as cashmere, is a luxury fiber obtained from cashmere goats and other types of goat. The word cashmere is an old spelling of Kashmir, the geographical region of India.

Cotton
Cotton

Soft and supple, cotton yarns are perfect for warm weather tops & accessories that will keep you knitting/crocheting year-round. Cotton yarns are known to be strong, durable, and have excellent water absorption properties with short drying times, which makes them great for the kiddos, bath and kitchen accessories.

source: yarn.com
Mohair
Mohair

Mohair / ˈ m oʊ h ɛər / is usually a silk-like fabric or yarn made from the hair of the Angora goat. Both durable and resilient, mohair is notable for its high luster and sheen, which has helped gain it the nickname the "Diamond Fiber", and is often used in fiber blends to add these qualities to a textile.

image: creatys.info
Rayon
Rayon

Rayon is the generic term for fiber (and the resulting yarn and fabric) manufactured of regenerated cellulose by any one of six processes. Its importance as a fiber lies in its versatility, and in the fact that it was the first viable manufactured fiber.

source: swicofil.com
Silk
Silk

Silk yarns create a fabric with a drape and touch that is almost impossible to rival. The gentle sheen and strength make silk a truly remarkable fabric and yarn. Garments knit with silk will have special fluidity you’ll long to keep close to the skin. Great for lace work and tops, some may find silk yarn a tad slippery to work with.

source: yarn.com
Wool
Wool

Shop our wide range of wool yarn and wool blends for knitting and crochet. Save up to 25% with our WEBS Discount every day.

source: yarn.com
image: craftsy.com

Related Facts

Related Types

Related Question Categories